Fast Facts

Public access to the results of federally funded research can accelerate scientific breakthroughs. In 2013, certain federal agencies were directed to create plans for increasing access to publications and data they funded.

The 19 agencies we reviewed made progress, but some have not fully implemented their plans. For example:

7 agencies have not taken steps to make data findable, such as creating a single web access point

4 don’t require all researchers to submit a plan to provide access to data

11 don’t fully ensure that researchers comply with access requirements

We made 37 recommendations to 16 agencies to address these and other issues.

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Highlights

What GAO Found

The 19 agencies that GAO reviewed have made progress implementing their plans to increase public access to federally funded research results (publications and data), as called for in a 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum. However, some agencies have not fully implemented some aspects of their plans, in particular those related to data access and mechanisms to ensure researchers comply with public access requirements.

Examples of Agencies' Progress Implementing Plans to Increase Public Access to Federally Funded Research Results

Public access plan topic

Extent of agency progress

Repositories

All 19 agencies have identified federally owned or managed locations, known as repositories, for preservation and public access to publications. For data, agencies rely on an array of federal and nonfederal repositories. However, seven agencies have not taken steps, such as establishing a single web-based point of access, or have not fully implemented plans to help the public find data stored across repositories. Taking such steps could better support public access to federally funded data.

Data management plans (DMPs)

Sixteen of 19 agencies reported requiring researchers to submit a DMP, which is supposed to describe how researchers will provide for long-term preservation and access to data they generate, or a justification for why that cannot be done. However, four agencies reported they have not established such requirements or have done so on a limited basis. Without requiring DMPs from agency-funded researchers, agencies may not be able to ensure that agency-funded data are being made publicly available.

Compliance

Eleven agencies reported that they have not fully developed or implemented mechanisms to ensure researchers comply with applicable public access requirements. Officials cited several reasons for this, including resource constraints and difficulty with tracking and measuring compliance. Without fully implementing compliance mechanisms—as called for in the OSTP memorandum—agencies may not have assurance that all appropriate federally funded research results are being made publicly available.

Source: GAO analysis of agency public access plan implementation efforts. | GAO-20-81

Agencies are coordinating with each other and with nonfederal stakeholders to implement public access plans, including through an interagency group led by OSTP and five other agencies. However, the group has not fully implemented selected leading practices identified by GAO that can enhance and sustain interagency collaboration, such as defining and articulating common outcomes. For example, according to OSTP staff, key outcomes have not yet been decided upon. Agency officials and stakeholders identified several challenges to implementing public access plans that interagency coordination might help them address, such as

Absence of common standards in several areas;

Measuring effectiveness of public access plan implementation; and

Balancing providing public access with safeguarding sensitive information.

By taking steps to fully implement relevant leading collaboration practices, the interagency group could help agencies better marshal their collective efforts to address common challenges to public access plan implementation.

Why GAO Did This Study

Research and development helps catalyze breakthroughs that improve the overall health and wellbeing of our society. Federal research and development expenditures averaged about $135 billion annually for fiscal years 2015 to 2017. According to OSTP, providing free public access to federally funded research results can improve both the impact and accountability of this important federal investment. In February 2013, OSTP directed federal agencies with more than $100 million in annual research and development expenditures to develop a plan to support increased public access to the results of federally funded research. GAO was asked to examine public access to federally funded research results. This report examines the extent of agencies' (1) progress implementing plans to increase public access to federally funded research results and (2) coordination on public access plan implementation. GAO administered a questionnaire to 19 federal agencies selected based on annual research and development expenditure amounts, among other criteria; reviewed agency documents; and interviewed officials from 11 agencies, OSTP, and 21 stakeholder organizations.

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Recommendations

GAO is making 37 recommendations to 16 agencies to promote full and effective implementation of agency public access plans. For example, GAO recommends that OSTP and 5 agencies leading a public access interagency group take steps to fully implement selected leading collaboration practices. Of the 16 agencies, 15 agreed with GAO's recommendations while 1 (OSTP) disagreed. GAO continues to believe the recommendation to OSTP is warranted.

Recommendations for Executive Action

Agency Affected Recommendation Status
Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 1)
Open
The Department of Defense partially concurred with this recommendation noting the challenge with balancing ensuring public access to research data with considerations of national security and personally identifiable information. As discussed in our report, our recommendation to DoD regarding findability and accessibility of agency-funded research data was qualified to pertain to appropriate agency-funded research data--recognizing that it might not be appropriate to make certain datasets publicly available because of national security or other concerns. In June 2020, DoD stated research data associated with public journal articles became publicly available on PubDefense, but that DoD is still researching methodologies that would identify situations where aggregation of multiple sets of unclassified data could reveal national security vulnerabilities. In May 2021, DoD provided an update stating it had issued guidance on the responsible release of DoD data, which includes initiating a study of existing pre-publication and security review policies, but that it did not know when it would be able to implement a formal methodology to make applicable DoD data available, as it has not fully developed and resourced a way to understand and mitigate the risks of data aggregation. When we confirm what methodology DOD has developed, we will provide updated information.
Department of Education The Secretary of Education should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 2)
Open
The Department of Education concurred with this recommendation. According to its response to our report, the Department awarded a contract to support enhancements to its Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) to link scholarly research publications supported by the Department to its publicly accessible datasets. In June 2020, Education stated it completed implementation of enhancements to ERIC to link scholarly research publications supported by the Department to its publicly accessible datasets. All grantees who submit through the ERIC submission system will be asked to submit a link to their data management plan, which includes a link to the underlying data. In addition, Education stated as part of an effort to minimize the burden for their grantees and contractors, they negotiated agreements with the publishers of over 600 education journals to display publicly funded articles in ERIC 12 months after publication or sooner. If grantees or contractors publish their work in a participating journal, the journal will submit the full text to ERIC on behalf of the grantee so that the grantee will not need to submit their work to the ERIC Online Submission portal. In February 2021, Education officials stated that six articles funded by Education through grantees or contractors and which were submitted through ERIC have links to research data. Education stated they expect this number to grow considerably in the future. In response to our follow up questions, Education officials stated awardees are only required to provide public access to the associated data when a peer-reviewed publication is released. Education officials stated there are no instances where they would expect there to be a finalized dataset without a publication. Once we assess what steps the Department has taken to analyze the extent to which Education funded data is created without a publication, we will provide additional information.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality The Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 3)
Open
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concurred with this recommendation. According to AHRQ officials, a draft data management policy articulating expectations for researchers to make agency-funded data readily findable and accessible to the public has been developed and is currently in the clearance process with AHRQ's Office of the Director and General Counsel. When we confirm these steps have been taken, we will provide updated information.
Food and Drug Administration The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 4)
Open
The Food and Drug Administration concurred with this recommendation. In May 2020, HHS told us that they consider this recommendation open. According to HHS officials, the FDA Library has completed a pilot for cataloging agency-funded research datasets in the FindIT system. Integration of FindIT with FDA systems and workflows that produce research data would result in a publicly accessible catalog of FDA research data irrespective of the physical location of those data. When we confirm what steps FDA has taken, we will provide updated information.
Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 5)
Open
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) concurred with this recommendation and noted that it was in the process of establishing a portal on its website to increase public access to agency-funded research. In February 2021, DHS officials stated they were in the process of completing an external website with a direct link to the DHS repository hosted by the National Institutes of Health. However, information provided by DHS officials did not indicate if the link would allow for public access to research data associated with DHS funding, nor did the information include a target completion date. When we clarify the extent of actions taken by DHS in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Veterans Affairs The Secretary of Veterans Affairs should take steps to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 6)
Open
The Department of Veterans Affairs concurred with this recommendation but indicated in its comments on the report that it had already taken steps to implement it. As discussed in the report, the department's efforts to ensure research data availability pertained to a portion of the agency's federally-funded research data. In a June 11, 2020 response, VA officials outlined planned actions and timelines to address this recommendation. Specifically, VA officials stated they would discuss with agency leadership and other potential VA partners how to make a broader set of VA-funded data findable and accessible. They also said they would continue submitting a funding request to the VHA IT Committee for Operations and Maintenance to meet requirements for enabling data to be findable and accessible. In addition, they said they would work through the Veterans Informatics and Computing Infrastructure division to explore opportunities and methods for making data from other types of research publicly accessible. Subsequently, in December 2020, VA officials provided an update stating that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted these plans but that they still intend to pursue previously identified plans, along with new efforts such as increasing the use of VA Data Commons to allow access to clinical and genetic resources data. They identified a target completion date of September 2022 for completing actions . We will update the status of this recommendation after receipt of any additional information on steps taken to address it.
National Science Foundation The Director of the National Science Foundation should fully implement plans to ensure appropriate agency-funded research data are readily findable and accessible to the public. (Recommendation 7)
Open
NSF concurred with this recommendation. According to its response to our report, NSF is expanding its public access repository to include metadata records about data that support publications resulting from NSF-funded research. NSF's response stated that, by storing metadata records for supporting datasets alongside metadata records for publications, the public will be able to more easily find and access appropriate agency funded research data. In May 2021, NSF indicated that the scheduled deployment date for system changes that would allow it to accept these metadata records is December 2021. We will provide an update when we obtain additional information about the status of implementing this recommendation.
Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should complete development of data management plan requirements for extramural researchers. (Recommendation 8)
Open
The Department of Defense concurred with this recommendation stating data management plan (DMP) requirements would be in place by September 2023. DoD officials stated requirements for award recipients have been proposed for the DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations, while similar requirements for contract awardees have been proposed for the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement. In May 2021, DoD provided an update stating that they will request a deviation from the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Basic Research Office in order to add a DMP requirement into new grants and other research assistance awards earlier than September 2023. If approved, DMP requirements for new DoD grants and other research assistance awards would be in effect by September 30, 2021. Once these requirements are complete, we will provide updated information.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality The Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality should complete development of data management plan requirements. (Recommendation 9)
Open
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concurred with this recommendation. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken to implement the recommendation we will provide updated information.
Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should complete development of data management plan requirements. (Recommendation 10)
Open
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) concurred with this recommendation, stating that it would develop a departmentwide management directive for research and development data as well as data management plan guidance and a template to document requirements. In a February 2021 update, DHS officials provided draft versions of its department-wide management directive for research data; a draft data management plan guidance document and template; and user guides relating to handling research data resulting from DHS funding. When we confirm the finalization of these documents relating to actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
United States Agency for International Development The U.S. Agency for International Development Administrator should complete development of data management plan requirements for extramural researchers. (Recommendation 11)
Closed - Implemented
The U.S. Agency for International Development agreed with this recommendation. In a June 2020 response USAID stated it would take action to establish data management plan (DMP) requirements, and was in the process of making substantial revisions to its data policy, found in Chapter 579 of its Automated Directives System (ADS), USAID Development Data. In September 2020, USAID officials responded that they completed the development of DMP requirements for extramural researchers, as applicable, revising Chapter 579 of its Development Data Policy to contain these new requirements. USAID officials added that they also established working groups to create additional technical-level guidance for DMPs. In March 2021, USAID officials confirmed that a July 31, 2020 revision of its policy was final, and the updated DMP requirements applied to extramural researchers.
Department of Agriculture The Secretary of Agriculture should complete development of guidance and provide training to agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans. (Recommendation 12)
Open
The U.S. Department of Agriculture agreed with the findings of our report. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
United States Agency for International Development The U.S. Agency for International Development Administrator should complete development of and provide training for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans. (Recommendation 13)
Closed - Implemented
The U.S. Agency for International Development agreed with this recommendation. In a June 2020 response, USAID stated it would complete the development of, and provide training for, agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans (DMPs). USAID noted it had already delivered preliminary training on data management planning and DMPs to specialized agency staff, and that it was advancing a training program that would include specific training and guidance on the development and evaluation of DMPs. In a September 2020 response, USAID officials provided an update on their training efforts, noting some disruptions due to COVID-19, but stating that training had resumed. They said training was provided to USAID's 12 Asia missions, focusing on best practices for data management planning, and was also developed for USAID's DATA Board on reviewing the merits of DMPs. USAID officials added that they had developed training guides and briefing documents to familiarize training participants with data management principles and necessary elements for a DMP. In a March 2021 update, USAID officials confirmed that its training efforts were offered for applicable staff that are responsible for reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans, and that the training was being made available across all of USAID and its missions worldwide. They also said USAID plans to continue to offer aspects of its training for the foreseeable future.
Food and Drug Administration The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 14)
Open
The Food and Drug Administration concurred with this recommendation. In May 2020, HHS officials told us that they consider this recommendation open. According to HHS officials, FDA was taking steps to increase public access to research results by improving the processes to ensure that appropriate agency-funded research publications and data are readily findable and accessible to the public. In conjunction with that process improvement, FDA was assessing training needs as part of change management. Additionally, FDA was collaborating with other agencies on the Subcommittee for Open Science (SOS), providing guidance to FDA staff on preprints, and assisting FDA authors, grant applicants and others in registering for Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) identifiers to enhance the discoverability of their research. When we confirm what steps FDA has taken, we will provide updated information.
Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 15)
Open
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) concurred with this recommendation, and indicated it would evaluate training needs for data management plan (DMP) reviews and develop plans to fulfill any additional training needs identified. In a February 2021 update, DHS officials stated that training has commenced. However, based on the information provided by DHS officials it was not clear if the training is intended for those involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' DMPs. In addition, it was not clear if the training would be administered to all DHS staff involved in the review of the merits of researchers' DMPs. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Veterans Affairs The Secretary of Veterans Affairs should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 16)
Open
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) concurred with this recommendation and identified several planned steps to identify and meet training needs for those involved in reviewing researchers' data management plans (DMPs). The department estimated these efforts would be completed by September 30, 2020. In a June 11, 2020 update, VA officials noted that it had completed a review of training needs in November 2019, which involved assessing its scientific review personnel's understanding of VA policies and standards related to DMPs. Through this process VA shared with its staff information on review processes, standards and guidance from other agencies, in particular the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute for Standards and Technology, related to DMP reviews. They said that through this process no additional training was found to be warranted. In a July 2021 update, VA officials clarified that VA's evaluation of training needs was limited to scientific personnel that manage scientific applications for funding support, and that VA's use of DMPs only applies to these scientific applications. In addition, they noted that processes, standards and guidance from other agencies are provided to its scientific personnel responsible for receipt, review and management of DMPs as part of their scope of activities. Finally, information provided by VA officials stated that receipt and review of DMPs are a part of standard operating procedures. We will update the status after VA provides additional documentation related to its implementation of this recommendation.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality The Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 17)
Open
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concurred with this recommendation stating that it would assess training needs for agency officials and others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and would develop and provide additional training if warranted. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken to implement the recommendation we will provide updated information.
Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 18)
Open
The Department of Defense concurred with this recommendation. In May 2021, DoD officials stated they are developing an automated data management plan tool as a template for researchers to use at the beginning of a research project. According to DoD officials, after development of this tool, a training program for researchers and program managers will be developed, if warranted, including an outline of the preferred structure for the DMP, a description of the essential elements of the plan and a methodology to evaluate its content. DoD officials expect to complete this work by September 30, 2021. Once these steps have been completed, we will provide updated information.
Department of Energy The Secretary of Energy should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 19)
Open
The Department of Energy concurred with this recommendation and stated it would assess and develop a plan to meet the training needs of internal DOE staff and external peer reviewers of data management plans. According to information DOE provided, as of May 2021, DOE's Office of Science is taking steps to update web-based guidance on data management and data management plans. The Office of Science plans for these changes to take effect with the release of funding opportunity announcements for fiscal year 2022. We will re-evaluate DOE's implementation of this recommendation when the agency provides additional information on actions it has taken to implement it.
Environmental Protection Agency The Environmental Protection Agency Administrator should evaluate training needs for agency officials or others involved in reviewing the merits of researchers' data management plans and, if additional training is found to be warranted, develop and provide such training. (Recommendation 20)
Open
The Environmental Protection Agency agreed with this recommendation stating that it planned to evaluate training needs for agency officials who review researchers' data management plans. According to information EPA provided in December 2020, the agency had developed a checklist for EPA managers and grant managers to use when reviewing data management plans. EPA indicated it plans to conduct data management plan training in 2021. When we confirm what additional actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Agriculture The Secretary of Agriculture should develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 21)
Open
The U.S. Department of Agriculture agreed with the findings of our report. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 22)
Open
The Department of Defense concurred with this recommendation. According to DoD officials, in May 2020, DoD research organizations performed a self-assessment of their compliance with public access requirements. The self-assessment found that DoD medical organizations were not sending articles stemming from DoD-funded research to DoD's Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) per DoD policy. While articles that were jointly funded with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were being sent to NIH's repository, PubMed Central, articles that were not jointly funded with NIH were not being made publicly available. To address this, DoD is taking steps to coordinate with NIH to ensure DoD-funded articles are made available through DoD's public facing interface, PubDefense, by developing a web service to download DoD-funded materials from PMC and also discussing with NIH whether non-NIH-funded documents may be deposited in PMC and then downloaded to DTIC's repository. Additionally, DoD officials stated the self-assessment led to an increase in submissions to DTIC and started conversations with DTIC on the best way to submit documents and DMPs to DTIC in an automated way. As a result, DTIC is conducting outreach to the DoD research offices to ensure that these offices are regularly reminded of the requirement to submit journal articles and DMPs and the need to create processes for continuous submission to the DoD repository at DTIC. DoD officials also said they are continuing to investigate methods to analyze DoD research projects to more easily identify instances of research organization non-compliance with their public access plan. Once DoD has made additional progress on these efforts, we will provide updated information.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality The Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality should develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements.(Recommendation 23)
Open
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concurred with this recommendation. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Food and Drug Administration The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration should develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 24)
Open
The Food and Drug Administration concurred with this recommendation. In May 2020, HHS told us that they consider this recommendation open. According to HHS officials, the FDA Library has begun implementation of a multi-faceted approach toward managing and reporting researcher compliance to include: (1) implementation of ORCID identifiers for federal staff, FDA contractors, and grantees and the proper affiliation of FDA with those ORCID records; (2) integration of FDA Center manuscript approval systems with a centralized repository of FDA publications and scientific datasets and (3) expansion of the FDA Library's new FindIT platform to include recording of and reporting on researcher compliance with public access plan and associated requirements. When we confirm what steps FDA has taken, we will provide updated information.
National Institutes of Health The Director of the National Institutes of Health should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 25)
Closed - Implemented
In October 2020, NIH issued its Data Management and Sharing Policy and accompanying supplemental information. According to the policy, it applies to all research, funded or conducted in whole or in part by NIH, that generates scientific data. The effective date of the NIH policy is January 25, 2023 (i.e., for competitive grant applications or contract proposals submitted for that date, or other research projects conducted on or after that date). The policy states that compliance with the data management and sharing plans developed pursuant to it is a term and condition of extramural awards and contracts, and that compliance for intramural research projects and other funding agreements will be enforced consistent with applicable NIH policies. The policy also indicates that, after the end of a funding period, non-compliance with a data management and sharing plan can be considered by NIH in determining whether to provide future funding to recipient institutions.
Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 26)
Open
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) concurred with this recommendation and stated it would develop a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the department's public access plan and data management plan requirements. In a February 2021 update, DHS officials said they participate in the Office of Science and Technology Policy's Subcommittee on Open Science, where they share lessons learned with respect to compliance tracking. However, the information provided by DHS officials did not provide specific information on how they will ensure researcher compliance with DHS's public access plan and associated requirements. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 27)
Open
The Department of Commerce agreed with this recommendation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration indicated it was pursuing multiple mechanisms to implement it. According to information NOAA provided in January and June 2021, the agency continues to pursue a multi-pronged approach to better understand the extent of compliance issues with its public access plan and to address them. For instance, in May 2021, NOAA's Acting Chief Scientist communicated the importance of complying with the public access plan agency-wide. NOAA's June 2021 update also indicated that the agency's Science Council continues to investigate the reasons for, and proposed changes to improve public access plan compliance. As we obtain more information about NOAA's actions in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Energy The Secretary of Energy should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 28)
Open
The Department of Energy concurred with this recommendation stating that it would develop a compliance mechanism to identify researchers receiving funding from DOE financial assistance awards who are not compliant with DOE's public access plan for publications. DOE estimated these efforts would be completed by December 31, 2020. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Veterans Affairs The Secretary of Veterans Affairs should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 29)
Open
The Department of Veterans Affairs concurred with this recommendation but indicated in its comments on the report that it had already taken steps to implement it. As discussed in the report, the department's public access compliance mechanism covered a portion of the agency's federally-funded research data. In a June 2020 update, VA indicated it planned to examine opportunities and develop plans that address public access for other types of research it supports, including compliance mechanisms. In a December 2020 update, VA officials noted that the COVID-19 pandemic had resulted in delays in its efforts, and indicated a new target completion date of September 2022. When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to the recommendation, we will provide updated information.
Department of Transportation The Secretary of Transportation should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 30)
Open
The Department of Transportation concurred with this recommendation. According to its response to our report, the Department will build upon existing compliance mechanisms to ensure researcher compliance with its public access plan and associated requirements. As part of this process, the Department reported that it plans to update its public access plan, and expects to complete these actions by December 31, 2020. On July 22, 2021, Transportation officials provided an update stating that the Department is working toward implementation of the identified actions by January 15, 2022. When we confirm what actions the Department has taken to implement this recommendation we will provide additional information.
National Institute of Standards and Technology The National Institute of Standards and Technology Director should fully develop and implement a mechanism to ensure researcher compliance with the public access plan and associated requirements. (Recommendation 31)
Open
The Department of Commerce agreed with this recommendation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) identified several planned steps to implement it. Specifically, in January 2021, NIST deployed a system developed to identify NIST-authored papers that have been published, and ensure that all NIST authors are in compliance with the requirement that papers are made freely available within 12 months of publication. Previously, NIST also completed a review of awardees' compliance with data management plan requirements, and took steps (e.g., developing a template and checklist) to address issues NIST identified. Additionally, NIST took steps to evaluate an option to ensure compliance with public access requirements by NIST awardees (i.e., extramural researchers). NIST determined that the option it evaluated would not be practical as of April 2021. We will further update the recommendation status when NIST provides additional information on steps taken to ensure compliance with public access requirements by NIST's extramural researchers.
Office of Science and Technology Policy
Priority Rec.
Priority recommendations are those that GAO believes warrant priority attention from heads of key departments or agencies.
As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the Office of Science and Technology Policy co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 32)
Open
OSTP disagreed with GAO's November 2019 recommendation but has taken steps to begin implementing it. In OSTP's comments on the report, it stated that the subcommittee had already taken steps to implement the leading practices GAO identified; however, OSTP officials did not provide documentation of these efforts and GAO continues to believe the recommendation is warranted. In October 2020 and May 2021, OSTP provided information on steps the subcommittee has taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results, including certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. Additionally, according to information provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in May 2021, NSF, in coordination with the other co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured the subcommittee's workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.
Department of Defense As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the Department of Defense co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 33)
Open
DOD concurred with GAO's November 2019 recommendation and provided information in May 2021 on steps it has taken or is taking as a result of its participation in the subcommittee. The information DOD provided was similar to information the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) provided in October 2020 and May 2021 on steps the subcommittee has taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results. These steps included certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. Additionally, according to information provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in May 2021, NSF, in coordination with the other co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured the subcommittee's workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.
Department of Energy As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the Department of Energy co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 34)
Open
DOE concurred with GAO's November 2019 recommendation and, in May 2021, provided information on steps taken to implement it. Specifically, according to the information DOE provided, the subcommittee continues to meet on a monthly basis to identify best practices among agencies and areas for collaboration in furthering shared public access goals. DOE also noted that the subcommittee is pursuing a work plan of actions for its individual working groups. This information was similar to information provided by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in October 2020 and May 2021 on steps the subcommittee has taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results, including certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. Additionally, according to information provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in May 2021, NSF, in coordination with the other co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured the subcommittee's workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.
National Institutes of Health As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the National Institutes of Health co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 35)
Open
NIH concurred with GAO's November 2019 recommendation and has taken steps to implement it. In October 2020 and May 2021, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) provided information on steps subcommittee agencies, such as NIH, have taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results, including certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. According to information NIH provided in May 2021, the subcommittee is preparing updated objectives and goals to address current needs, including fully implementing leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. NSF provided similar information in May 2021, noting that the subcommittee co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured its workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 36)
Open
NOAA concurred with GAO's November 2019 recommendation, noting that NOAA would work with the subcommittee to identify more opportunities for collaboration to promote access to research results. In August 2020 and June 2021, NOAA provided information on efforts to work with other federal agencies on issues related to public access to research results. For example, NOAA described efforts to work with other subcommittee agencies to develop a collection of best practices that agencies have found to increase public access compliance. This information was similar to information provided by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in October 2020 and May 2021 on steps subcommittee agencies have taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results, including certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. Additionally, according to information provided by NSF in May 2021, NSF, in coordination with the other co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured the subcommittee's workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.
National Science Foundation As the Subcommittee on Open Science moves forward, the National Science Foundation co-chair, in coordination with other co-chairs and participating agencies, should take steps to fully implement leading practices that enhance and sustain collaboration. (Recommendation 37)
Open
NSF concurred with GAO's November 2019 recommendation and has taken steps to implement it. In October 2020 and May 2021, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) provided information on steps subcommittee agencies, such as NSF, have taken to address issues associated with public access to federally funded research results, including certain areas GAO identified as presenting challenges to public access plan implementation in the November 2019 report. For example, the information OSTP provided included details on efforts to develop common data management plan elements, standards for metadata and machine readability, and desirable characteristics for data repositories, as well as efforts to help improve compliance with agencies' public access policies. Additionally, according to information provided by NSF in May 2021, NSF, in coordination with the other co-chairs and participating agencies, rebuilt and restructured the subcommittee's workplan, which it used to organize activities in calendar year 2020. The workplan highlighted high-value action categories and clarified relationships between actions and deliverables. According to NSF, since January 2021, OSTP leadership has signaled a desire to change how subcommittee activities are coordinated. The subcommittee awaits further OSTP guidance about how to adapt the workplan. GAO will collect and evaluate additional information to determine the extent to which these steps incorporate leading practices for interagency collaboration GAO has identified. By taking steps to fully implement the relevant leading practices we have identified, the subcommittee and its member agencies could better marshal their collective efforts to address common public access plan implementation challenges that agency officials and stakeholders identified.

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