Public Health Preparedness:

HHS Should Take Actions to Ensure It Has an Adequate Number of Effectively Trained Emergency Responders

GAO-20-525: Published: Jun 18, 2020. Publicly Released: Jun 18, 2020.

Multimedia:

  • PODCAST: Public Health Preparedness: Ensuring an Adequate Number of Trained Emergency Responders

    Recently, the Department of Health and Human Services deployed about 1,200 medical professionals to respond to the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S. However, HHS has, at times, experienced shortages in the supply of these workers. We talk with Mary Denigan-Macauley, a health policy expert, about HHS's ability to respond to public health emergencies.

    View the transcript

Additional Materials:

Contact:

Mary Denigan-Macauley, Ph.D.
(202) 512-7114
deniganmacauleym@gao.gov

 

Office of Public Affairs
(202) 512-4800
youngc1@gao.gov

Medical emergency responders (e.g. doctors and nurses) enrolled in a Department of Health and Human Services program can be called up and sent to help states and localities in a public health emergency.

But HHS doesn’t know if it has enough responders available with the critical skills and competencies needed for current or future emergencies. In 2017, for example, HHS had a responder shortage and relied on the Department of Defense to provide medical care.

Also, HHS needs to evaluate its training to ensure that it effectively prepares responders for national emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic. Our 5 recommendations address these issues.

HHS Medical Emergency Responders at a Response Preparation Briefing

Response team personnel

Response team personnel

Multimedia:

  • PODCAST: Public Health Preparedness: Ensuring an Adequate Number of Trained Emergency Responders

    Recently, the Department of Health and Human Services deployed about 1,200 medical professionals to respond to the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S. However, HHS has, at times, experienced shortages in the supply of these workers. We talk with Mary Denigan-Macauley, a health policy expert, about HHS's ability to respond to public health emergencies.

    View the transcript

Additional Materials:

Contact:

Mary Denigan-Macauley, Ph.D.
(202) 512-7114
deniganmacauleym@gao.gov

 

Office of Public Affairs
(202) 512-4800
youngc1@gao.gov

What GAO Found

Major natural disasters in the past 3 years, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic, have heightened attention to the nation's ability to respond to these types of emergencies. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is responsible for leading the public health and medical response to emergencies. HHS responded to COVID-19, in part, by deploying responders enrolled in the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). These individuals, such as doctors and nurses, generally work outside the federal government and are federal employees used intermittently. In 2018, HHS developed an enrollment target for NDMS of 6,290 responders, but GAO found HHS did not follow key principles of effective strategic workforce planning in developing this target. For example, HHS did not identify the critical skills and competencies needed of its NDMS workforce to meet current and future programmatic results. Specifically, HHS's target does not take into consideration three key areas: a workforce capable of responding to (1) a nationwide event or multiple concurrent events, (2) the needs of at-risk individuals, and (3) the availability of other medical responders. Consequently, HHS cannot be sure its target, if achieved, will provide an adequate number of responders with the skill sets needed to effectively respond.

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HHS requires responders to take web-based training prior to deployment, such as characteristics of infectious diseases, and also offers optional in-person training, such as care delivery in a severe environment. However, HHS's process to evaluate its training does not align with key practices. As a result, HHS does not have assurance that it is effectively preparing responders for deployment, including keeping them and others safe during an emergency, such as COVID-19. For example, HHS requires a web-based course on donning and doffing personal protective equipment to protect against infectious disease, biological, and chemical threats. However, HHS does not know the training's effectiveness until responders have deployed; at which point, if ineffective, responders could potentially expose themselves to hazards. Further, HHS officials state their in-person training is most beneficial but more costly to provide, limiting its provision. A more effective training evaluation process would help the agency determine which in-person courses are most beneficial and should be prioritized, or even made mandatory, for effective and safe responder deployment.

Why GAO Did This Study

NDMS is the main program through which HHS enrolls responders to assist with the federal medical and public health response to public health emergencies. HHS deploys NDMS responders to provide, among other things, patient care and movement. During the 2017 hurricanes, NDMS had a shortage of responders that resulted in HHS relying on other departments, such as the Department of Defense, to provide medical care. As of December 2019, HHS had 3,667 NDMS responders.

The Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019 included a provision for GAO to review HHS's responder surge capacity. This report examines (1) the workforce planning for NDMS responders to assist with public health emergencies, and (2) training provided to these responders.

To conduct this work, GAO reviewed agency NDMS planning documentation, including NDMS staffing decisions, team structures, and training materials; compared HHS actions to key workforce planning practices; and interviewed HHS officials.

What GAO Recommends

GAO is making five recommendations to HHS, including to develop a workforce target that accounts for the critical skills and competencies that are needed to meet current and future programmatic results and to develop processes for evaluating its training to ensure an effectively trained workforce. HHS concurred with our recommendations and generally plans to take action.

For more information, contact Mary Denigan-Macauley at (202) 512-7114 or deniganmacauleym@gao.gov.

Recommendations for Executive Action

  1. Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: ASPR should develop an NDMS responder workforce target that aligns with the goals and objectives in ASPR's forthcoming strategic plan. (Recommendation 1)

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

  2. Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: ASPR should develop an NDMS responder workforce target that accounts for the critical skills and competencies that are needed to meet current and future programmatic results, such as a workforce target that considers (1) a nationwide event or multiple concurrent events, (2) the needs of at-risk individuals, and (3) the availability of other medical responders. (Recommendation 2)

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

  3. Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: ASPR should develop strategies to fill gaps to achieve its revised workforce target. (Recommendation 3)

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

  4. Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: ASPR should develop a process to evaluate the web-based and in-person training provided to NDMS responders using GAO-identified key practices for evaluating training. (Recommendation 4)

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

  5. Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: ASPR should develop a process or approach to prioritize various in-person training needs for its NDMS responders while taking into account budget constraints. (Recommendation 5)

    Agency Affected: Department of Health and Human Services: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response

 

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