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    Subject Term: "Communication systems"

    3 publications with a total of 7 open recommendations
    Director: Goldstein, Mark L
    Phone: (202) 512-2834

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: The Secretary of Homeland Security should direct that OEC examine the composition and functioning of SAFECOM to determine whether all relevant stakeholder groups are adequately represented and their views adequately expressed and considered through memberships in the organizations, executive committees, subcommittees, working groups, or other means. (Recommendation 1)

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security
    Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
    Recommendation: FirstNet should examine the composition and functioning of PSAC to determine whether all relevant stakeholder groups are adequately represented and their views adequately expressed and considered through memberships in the organizations, executive committees, subcommittees, working groups, or other means. (Recommendation 2)

    Agency: Department of Commerce: National Telecommunications and Information Administration: First Responder Network Authority
    Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
    Director: Goldstein, Mark L
    Phone: (202) 512-2834

    4 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To ensure that the increasing risks of GPS disruptions to the nation's critical infrastructure are effectively managed, the Secretary of Homeland Security should increase the reliability and usefulness of the GPS risk assessment by developing a plan and time frame to collect relevant threat, vulnerability, and consequence data for the various critical infrastructure sectors, and periodically review the readiness of data to conduct a more data-driven risk assessment while ensuring that DHS's assessment approach is more consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP).

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security
    Status: Open

    Comments: DHS officials had previously indicated that DHS's Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP) and Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis (OCIA) have discussed an update of the GPS risk assessment, noting that such an update may be included in fiscal year 2017 planning documents. However, as of February 2017, no documentation had been provided that demonstrates such plans. Additionally, information from DHS shows that DHS has continued other efforts to collect potentially relevant threat, vulnerability, and consequence data for various GPS equipment in use. For example, according to DHS officials, DHS has conducted visits to major maritime, finance, wireless communications, and electricity firms to gauge their understanding of GPS vulnerabilities and of technology- and strategy-based efforts to improve GPS resilience, and DHS documentation shows that DHS has held events to test GPS receivers as part of assessing vulnerabilities. We will update the status of this recommendation after we receive additional information from DHS.
    Recommendation: To ensure that the increasing risks of GPS disruptions to the nation's critical infrastructure are effectively managed, the Secretary of Homeland Security should, as part of current critical infrastructure protection planning with Sector-Specific Agencys (SSAs) and sector partners, develop and issue a plan and metrics to measure the effectiveness of GPS risk mitigation efforts on critical infrastructure resiliency.

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of February 2017, DHS documentation shows that DHS has worked with Sector Specific Agencies (SSAs) and other interagency partners to help manage GPS risks and continues to communicate information on risks to critical infrastructure partners. For example, according to DHS officials, this included briefing field staff and developing questions for infrastructure surveys to gather information on GPS resilience at the facility level. According to DHS officials, at the national level DHS included GPS in discussions with SSAs on topics they could include in their Sector-Specific Plans (each SSA develops a Sector-Specific Plan to detail risk management in its critical infrastructure sector), but DHS has also indicated that sector-oriented metrics are not a viable means of assessing risk management actions. We will update the status of this recommendation after we receive additional information from DHS.
    Recommendation: To improve collaboration and address uncertainties in fulfilling the National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD-39) backup-capabilities requirement, the Secretaries of Transportation and Homeland Security should establish a formal, written agreement that details how the agencies plan to address their shared responsibility. This agreement should address uncertainties, including clarifying and defining DOT's and DHS's respective roles, responsibilities, and authorities; establishing clear, agreed-upon outcomes; establishing how the agencies will monitor and report on progress toward those outcomes; and setting forth the agencies' plans for examining relevant issues, such as the roles of SSAs and industry, how NSPD-39 fits into the NIPP risk management framework, whether an update to the NSPD-39 is needed, or other issues as deemed necessary by the agencies.

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of February 2017, the National Executive Committee for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Executive Steering group had established an interagency team called the "Complementary PNT Tiger Team" co-chaired by DHS, DOT, and DOD. This team was formed to manage the federal government's efforts to establish a national backup system to GPS. According to DHS officials, this organizational structure obviates the need for a formal, written agreement between DOT and DHS specific to GPS backup responsibilities. They also stated that, in a separate but related effort, DHS, DOT, and DOD are discussing a tri-lateral agreement that covers a broad spectrum of PNT-related responsibilities and activities. We will update the status of this recommendation after we receive additional information from DHS.
    Recommendation: To improve collaboration and address uncertainties in fulfilling the National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD-39) backup-capabilities requirement, the Secretaries of Transportation and Homeland Security should establish a formal, written agreement that details how the agencies plan to address their shared responsibility. This agreement should address uncertainties, including clarifying and defining DOT's and DHS's respective roles, responsibilities, and authorities; establishing clear, agreed-upon outcomes; establishing how the agencies will monitor and report on progress toward those outcomes; and setting forth the agencies' plans for examining relevant issues, such as the roles of SSAs and industry, how NSPD-39 fits into the NIPP risk management framework, whether an update to the NSPD-39 is needed, or other issues as deemed necessary by the agencies.

    Agency: Department of Transportation
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of February 2017, the National Executive Committee for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Executive Steering group had established an interagency team--called the "Complementary PNT Tiger Team"--co-chaired by DHS, DOT, and DOD. This team was formed to manage the federal government's efforts to establish a national backup system to GPS. According to DHS officials, this organizational structure obviates the need for a formal, written agreement between DOT and DHS specific to GPS backup responsibilities. They also stated that, in a separate but related effort, DHS, DOT, and DOD are discussing a tri-lateral agreement that covers a broad spectrum of PNT-related responsibilities and activities. We will update the status of this recommendation after we receive additional information from DOT.
    Director: Powner, David A
    Phone: (202)512-6408

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: Congress may wish to consider requiring the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and Treasury to collaborate on the development and implementation of a joint radio communications solution. Specifically, Congress may wish to consider requiring the departments to (1) establish an effective governance structure that includes a formal process for making decisions and resolving disputes, (2) define and articulate a common outcome for this joint effort, and (3) develop a joint strategy for improving radio communications.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: Congress enacted legislation and introduced a few other bills in the House of Representatives during the last Congress that were aimed at improving interoperable communications. However, Congress has not yet passed legislation that would require all three departments to collaborate on a joint communications solution. As a result, GAO maintains that Congress should consider requiring the three departments to collaborate on the development and implementation of a joint radio communications solution in order to improve the interoperability of radio communications systems and potentially achieve savings.