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    Subject Term: Plants

    1 publication with a total of 2 open recommendations
    Director: Irving, Susan J
    Phone: (202) 512-6806

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In light of declining discretionary budgets, to reduce or eliminate the reliance of the AQI program on taxpayer funding, Congress should consider allowing USDA to set AQI fees to recover the aggregate estimated costs of AQI services--thereby allowing the Secretary of Agriculture to set fee rates to recover the full costs of the AQI program.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of March 2017, Congress had not passed legislation to give the Secretary of Agriculture authority to set fee rates to fully recover the aggregate costs of agricultural quarantine inspection (AQI) services, as GAO suggested in March 2013. In the 114th Congress, the Savings, Accountability, Value, and Efficiency Act of 2015 was introduced in the House and referred to the committees of jurisdiction. The act would require the Secretary of Agriculture to (1) study whether the amount of AQI fees collected cover the aggregate costs of AQI services, and (2) report to Congress the results of the study and any recommendations for ensuring that fees covered costs. The act would not authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to set fee rates to recover the full costs of the AQI program. The current AQI fee authority does not permit the U.S. Department of Agriculture to set AQI fees to recover the aggregate estimated costs of AQI services. Authorizing the Secretary of Agriculture to set fee rates to recover the full costs of the AQI program would save the federal government money by reducing the program's reliance on U.S. Customs and Border Protection's annual Salaries and Expenses appropriation.
    Recommendation: Congress should consider amending USDA's authorization to assess AQI fees on bus companies, private vessels, and private aircraft and include in those fees the costs of AQI services for the passengers on those buses, private vessels, and private aircraft.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of March 2017, Congress had not passed legislation to give the Secretary of Agriculture authority to assess agricultural quarantine inspection (AQI) fees on private vessels, private aircraft, and commercial buses and include in those fees the costs of AQI services for the passengers on those vehicles. In the 114th Congress, the Savings, Accountability, Value, and Efficiency Act of 2015 was introduced in the House and referred to the committees of jurisdiction. The act would require the Secretary of Agriculture to (1) study whether the amount of AQI fees collected cover the aggregate costs of AQI services, and (2) report to Congress the results of the study and any recommendations for ensuring that fees covered costs. The current AQI fee authority does not permit the U.S. Department of Agriculture to assess AQI fees on private vessels, private aircraft and commerical buses and to recover, through those fees, the costs of AQI services for the passengers on those vehicles.