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    Results:

    Subject Term: Licenses

    8 publications with a total of 17 open recommendations including 3 priority recommendations
    Director: Frank Rusco
    Phone: (202) 512-3841

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To enhance the transparency and timeliness of NRC's fee-setting process, the Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should direct NRC staff to clearly present information in NRC's proposed fee rule, final fee rule, and fee work papers, by defining and consistently using key terms, providing complete calculations for how fees are determined, and ensuring the accuracy of the fee rules and work papers, so that stakeholders can understand fee calculations and provide substantive comments to the agency on them.

    Agency: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Status: Open

    Comments: According to NRC, it has provided more detailed explanations and calculations in its fiscal year 2017 proposed fee rule. The agency plans to propose codifying some of these changes in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 170 during its fiscal year 2018 fee rulemaking. We will review NRC's changes after it has codified them in the Code of Federal Regulations and will update the status of this recommendation at that time.
    Recommendation: To enhance the transparency and timeliness of NRC's fee-setting process, the Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should direct NRC staff to develop objective, measurable, and quantifiable performance goals and measures that enable NRC to assess the extent to which its efforts to improve transparency and timeliness are successful and implement a plan and schedule for comparing results with the established performance goals.

    Agency: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Status: Open

    Comments: NRC convened a steering committee to provide leadership for implementing its efforts to improve transparency and timeliness of its fee-setting process. According to NRC, the steering committee has developed performance measures to gauge success and will monitor planned activities to compare results with the performance goals. We will review NRC's activities to improve transparency and timeliness, as well as the steering committee's actions to measure and monitor success. We will update the status of this recommendation upon completion of our review.
    Director: Brenda S. Farrell
    Phone: (202) 512-3604

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To improve the management of DOD's credentialing program and better determine whether the program is achieving its desired results, the Secretary of Defense should direct the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to develop and implement program performance measures that include key attributes, such as a baseline and goals, that can be used to assess performance.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: DOD did not concur with our recommendation to develop and implement performance measures for its credentialing program. As of August 23, 2017, the department still has yet to develop performance measures for the program.
    Director: Elizabeth Curda
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    1 open recommendations
    including 1 priority recommendation
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that veterans receive quality care from qualified physicians, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs should direct the Under Secretary for Health to develop and implement a comprehensive oversight strategy that includes ongoing monitoring and evaluations of the contractors' verification of PC3 and Choice physicians' credentials, as well as VHA staff's review of Choice physicians. VHA's oversight should include reviewing documentation and assessing whether the contractors' plans for improving their processes for Choice credentials verification are effective.

    Agency: Department of Veterans Affairs
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: In June and July 2017, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) completed separate audit evaluations of both contractors' verification of Patient-Centered Community Care (PC3) and Choice physicians' credentials. This supplements the ongoing monitoring that VHA already had in place for routinely and independently checking the credentials for a sample of PC3 and Choice providers. However, as of October 2017, VHA has not yet implemented a strategy to oversee VHA staff's review of Choice physicians through the VHA Choice Provider Agreement program.
    Director: David C. Trimble
    Phone: (202) 512-3841

    3 open recommendations
    including 2 priority recommendations
    Recommendation: Because some quantities of radioactive materials are potentially dangerous to human health if not properly handled, NRC should take action to better track and secure these materials and verify the legitimacy of the licenses for those who seek to possess them. Specifically, the NRC should take the steps needed to include category 3 sources in the National Source Tracking System and add agreement state category 3 licenses to the Web-based Licensing System as quickly as reasonably possible.

    Agency: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: In October 2016, NRC issued a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) "Proposed Staff Re-Evaluation of Category 3 Source Accountability," (SRM-COMJMB-16-0001) and directed NRC staff to take specific actions to evaluate whether it is necessary to revise NRC regulations or processes governing source protection and accountability for Category 3 sources. Among other things, this re-evaluation will consider GAO's recommendations. This re-evaluation is due to be submitted to the Commission by August 2017.
    Recommendation: Because some quantities of radioactive materials are potentially dangerous to human health if not properly handled, NRC should take action to better track and secure these materials and verify the legitimacy of the licenses for those who seek to possess them. Specifically, the NRC should at least until such time that category 3 licenses can be verified using the License Verification System, require that transferors of category 3 quantities of radioactive materials confirm the validity of a would-be purchaser's radioactive materials license with the appropriate regulatory authority before transferring any category 3 quantities of licensed materials.

    Agency: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: In October 2016, NRC issued a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) "Proposed Staff Re-Evaluation of Category 3 Source Accountability," (SRM-COMJMB-16-0001) and directed NRC staff to take specific actions to evaluate whether it is necessary to revise NRC regulations or processes governing source protection and accountability for Category 3 sources. Among other things, this re-evaluation will consider GAO's recommendations. This re-evaluation is due to be submitted to the Commission by August 2017. The License Verification and Transfer of Category 3 Sources Working Group (LVWG) evaluated this recommendation, and its analysis will be considered by the Category 3 Source Security and Accountability Working Group in the development of the notation vote paper that will be submitted to the Commission in August 2017.
    Recommendation: Because some quantities of radioactive materials are potentially dangerous to human health if not properly handled, NRC should take action to better track and secure these materials and verify the legitimacy of the licenses for those who seek to possess them. Specifically, the NRC should, as part of the ongoing efforts of NRC working groups meeting to develop enhancements to the prelicensing requirements for category 3 licenses, consider requiring that an on-site security review be conducted for all unknown applicants of category 3 licenses to verify that each applicant is prepared to implement the required security measures before taking possession of licensed radioactive materials.

    Agency: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    Status: Open

    Comments: In October 2016, NRC issued a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) "Proposed Staff Re-Evaluation of Category 3 Source Accountability," (SRM-COMJMB-16-0001) and directed NRC staff to take specific actions to evaluate whether it is necessary to revise NRC regulations or processes governing source protection and accountability for Category 3 sources. Among other things, this re-evaluation will consider GAO's recommendations. This re-evaluation is due to be submitted to the Commission by August 2017.
    Director: Seto Bagdoyan
    Phone: (202) 512-6722

    5 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop a legislative proposal requesting authority to require SSNs for all individuals, regardless of whether they hold an individual or business registration.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us it is exploring the possibility and practicality of implementing policy or rule changes that would require Social Security Numbers (SSN) from all persons applying for a DEA Registration as a practitioner or mid-level practitioner. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop policies and procedures to validate SSNs and apply the policies and procedures to all new and existing SSNs in the CSA2; such an approach could involve collaborating with SSA to assess the feasibility of checking registrants' SSNs against the Enumeration Verification System.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that it had initiated discussions with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to determine the legality and feasibility of using SSA's Enumeration Verification System (EVS) to verify SSNs provided during the registration process. DEA stated that SSA has informed both GAO and DEA that its current legislative authorities do not authorize SSA to provide the information to DEA. As a a result, DEA stated that legislative action will be required to allow DEA additional access to EVS. As stated in our report, the use of EVS is one possible approach to validate SSNs. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop a legislative proposal to request access to SSA's full death file.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that the Social Security Administration (SSA) determined that it cannot provide data from the full death file to DEA under existing law for use in administering the DEA Registration Process. DEA also said that if legislative changes allow DEA full access to SSA's full death file, DEA will work with SSA to ensure implementation of the new legislative authority. We continue to believe that DEA should develop a legislative proposal to request access to SSA's full death file and we will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should identify and implement a cost-effective approach to monitor state licensure and disciplinary actions taken against its registrants; such an approach could include using data sources that contain this information, such as the National Practitioner Data Bank or the Federation of State Medical Boards.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that currently, the Controlled Substance Act and its implementing regulations do not specifically give DEA authority to access state medical licensing boards' databases. DEA also said that it met with representatives of the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) to develop a process that will allow DEA to accomplish the objectives GAO articulated in the draft report. Specifically, DEA said that it is exploring use of the FSMB service to verify the existence and status of state licenses to ensure all applicants for registration who are Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Osteopathy, or Physician Assistants (in the states that provide this data to FSMB), meet the requirements to possess a DEA Registration. To implement the above described actions, DEA stated it will need to enter into an agreement with FSMB to provide this data in a format that allows real-time access to the data and accommodates the large numbers of applicants for DEA Registrations. DEA also said it obtained information from FSMB to begin the agreement process and is currently obtaining information on data elements that can be used to test user account codes to flag records in the FSMB. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should assess the cost and feasibility of developing procedures for monitoring registrants' criminal backgrounds, such as conducting matches against federal law-enforcement databases, and document decisions about the approach chosen.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us they are in the process of determining the feasibility of implementing actions that would permit DEA to comply with the recommendation utilizing the current legal framework and within reasonable cost parameters. DEA also said that the large volume of DEA registrations and the large number of applications received monthly present extensive technical and fiscal challenges with addressing this recommendation. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Director: Seto J. Bagdoyan
    Phone: (202) 512-6722

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To further improve efforts to limit improper payments, including fraud, in the Medicaid program, the Acting Administrator of CMS should provide guidance to states on the availability of automated information through Medicare's enrollment database--the Provider Enrollment, Chain and Ownership System (PECOS)--and full access to all pertinent PECOS information, such as ownership information, to help screen Medicaid providers more efficiently and effectively.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: HHS considers this recommendation closed because they provide states with training and direct access to PECOS on an ongoing basis. Additionally, CMS also makes Medicare Enrollment data available to states through custom data extracts. We do not consider this action sufficient to close the recommendation, to provide states information on the availability of automated information through PECOS. For example, custom extracts do not constitute automated information containing all information in PECOS states need to screen providers in Medicaid. Additionally, the states the we interviewed for our study were not aware that custom extracts were available. CMS should provide guidance to state Medicaid programs that this information is available until fully automated access to PECOS is available. We reached out to CMS about the status of this recommendation. As of May 2017, we have not received a response. We will continue to monitor progress on this recommendation.
    Director: Maurer, Diana C
    Phone: (202) 512-9627

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To improve disposition reporting that would help states update and complete criminal history records, the Director of the FBI should task the FBI Advisory Policy Board to establish a plan with time frames and milestones for achieving its Disposition Task Force's stated goals.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Federal Bureau of Investigation
    Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
    Recommendation: To better equip states to meet the regulatory requirement to notify individuals of their rights to challenge and update information in their criminal history records, and to ensure that audit findings are resolved, the Director of the FBI--in coordination with the Compact Council-- should determine why states do not comply with the requirement to notify applicants and use this information to revise its state educational programs accordingly.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Federal Bureau of Investigation
    Status: Open

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
    Director: Goldstein, Mark L
    Phone: (202)512-6670

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: The Federal Communications Commission should explore options for assessing how the three types of low-power television stations have affected the communities they serve and have contributed to FCC's policy goals of localism and diversity. Such an assessment could include evaluating what existing data FCC could use and what additional data should be collected to inform such an assessment.

    Agency: Federal Communications Commission
    Status: Open

    Comments: In Apri 2014, FCC officials indicated that FCC will issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on issues relating to the future of low-power television and translator stations. In addition, FCC officials noted that the upcoming spectrum incentive auction and spectrum repack will affect low-power television stations, since these stations have secondary spectrum rights to full-power stations. When the notice of proposed rulemaking is issued, we will assess the extent to which it addresses this recommendation.
    Recommendation: The Federal Communications Commission should work with Congress, as necessary, to determine what the long-term role of Class A stations should be, whether additional low-power television stations should be permitted to apply for Class A status, and what criteria stations must meet to qualify for such status. Such criteria could include attributes that contribute to FCC's goals of serving underserved communities and enhancing localism and diversity, such as providing locally produced programming and programming otherwise unavailable to communities.

    Agency: Federal Communications Commission
    Status: Open

    Comments: In Apri 2014, FCC officials indicated that FCC will issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on issues relating to the future of low-power television and translator stations. In addition, FCC officials noted that the upcoming spectrum incentive auction and spectrum repack will affect low-power television stations, since these stations have secondary spectrum rights to full-power stations. When the notice of proposed rulemaking is issued, we will assess the extent to which it addresses this recommendation.