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    Subject Term: "Youth education programs"

    1 publication with a total of 2 open recommendations
    Director: Linda Kohn
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To help determine if programs are effective at supporting those individuals with serious mental illness, the Secretaries of Defense, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, and the Attorney General--which oversee programs targeting individuals with serious mental illness--should document which of their programs targeted for individuals with serious mental illness should be evaluated and how often such evaluations should be completed.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Defense's position is that it already engages in periodic program evaluation of its psychological health programs as required. It noted that on November 24, 2014, the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness directed the Military Departments and other Department of Defense components to assist in an initiative to evaluate Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury programs across the Department of Defense. As of September 2017, we have not received a further update on the Department of Defense's actions. We will continue to monitor these efforts and seek to determine whether they result in documentation of which programs should be evaluated and how such evaluations should be completed.
    Recommendation: To help determine if programs are effective at supporting those individuals with serious mental illness, the Secretaries of Defense, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, and the Attorney General--which oversee programs targeting individuals with serious mental illness--should document which of their programs targeted for individuals with serious mental illness should be evaluated and how often such evaluations should be completed.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: HHS did not concur with this recommendation. The Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Reform Act of 2016 enacted in December 2016 included a requirement for HHS to develop a strategy for conducting ongoing evaluations of programs related to mental illness--including serious mental illness--and substance use disorders. As of August 2017, HHS is in the process of preparing a report that identifies key programs and activities across the department, as well as summarizes data on those programs and develops criteria for use in prioritizing programs for evaluation. However, this report is not yet complete. We will continue to monitor HHS's efforts in this regard and look for documentation of HHS plans for future evaluations of programs for individuals with serious mental illness.