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    Subject Term: "Treasury securities"

    3 publications with a total of 9 open recommendations
    Director: Irving, Susan J
    Phone: (202) 512-6806

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To avoid serious disruptions to the Treasury market and to help inform the fiscal policy debate in a timely way, Congress should consider alternative approaches that better link decisions about the debt limit with decisions about spending and revenue at the time those decisions are made such as those described in this report.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 temporarily suspended the debt limit until March 15, 2017. This allowed the Treasury to continue to borrow to meet the funding needs of the federal government but did not explicitly link decisions about the debt limit to legislation that is expected to increase borrowing needs or debate over specific tax or spending proposal and their effect on debt. We will continue to monitor legislation enacting future debt limit increases to see if it addresses our matter for congressional consideration. As of August 2017 no relevant legislation has been enacted.
    Recommendation: However, if Congress chooses to continue to temporarily suspend the debt limit, it should consider providing Treasury with more flexibility in the level of Treasury's operating cash so that it is based not on the level that it was just prior to a suspension period, but on the federal government's immediate borrowing needs. This would minimize some of the disruptions to Treasury's normal cash management and debt issuance.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 temporarily suspended the debt limit until March 15, 2017, but did not provide Treasury with more flexibility in the level of Treasury's operating cash at the end of the suspension period. As result, absent future action, Treasury is expected to reduced its cash balance to approximately the level it was at on the date the suspension was enacted as it has following previous debt limit suspensions, regardless of cyclical or other cash management needs. We will continue to monitor legislation enacting future debt limit increases to see if it addresses our matter for congressional consideration. As of August 2017, no relevant legislation has been enacted.
    Director: Susan J. Irving
    Phone: (202) 512-6806

    3 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To help minimize Treasury borrowing costs over time by better understanding and managing the risks posed by Treasury floating rate notes and by enhancing demand for Treasury securities, the Secretary of the Treasury should track and report an additional measure of the length of the portfolio that captures the interest rate reset frequency of securities in the portfolio.

    Agency: Department of the Treasury
    Status: Open

    Comments: Treasury agreed with our recommendation but has not yet introduced this additional metric. As of August 2017, the metric had not been introduced.
    Recommendation: To help minimize Treasury borrowing costs over time by better understanding and managing the risks posed by Treasury floating rate notes and by enhancing demand for Treasury securities, the Secretary of the Treasury should examine opportunities for additional new security types, such as FRNs with maturities other than 2 years or ultra-long bonds.

    Agency: Department of the Treasury
    Status: Open

    Comments: Treasury agreed with our recommendation but has not yet taken steps to consider additional securities. We will continue to monitor information released from TBAC conferences and in follow up conversations with Treasury.
    Recommendation: To help minimize Treasury borrowing costs over time by better understanding and managing the risks posed by Treasury floating rate notes and by enhancing demand for Treasury securities, the Secretary of the Treasury should analyze the price effects of the mismatch between the term of the index rate and the reset period.

    Agency: Department of the Treasury
    Status: Open

    Comments: Treasury agreed with our recommendation took introductory steps in 2014 to analyze the price effects of the mismatch by meeting with us to discuss our modeling approach. The results of their analysis was not conclusive and no action was taken at the time. We are seeking documentation of any further action that would allow us to close this recommendation as implemented.
    Director: St James, Lorelei
    Phone: (202) 512-2834

    4 open recommendations
    Recommendation: A key matter for Congress to consider is whether or not to move forward with a USPS health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. If Congress decides to approve this proposal, then Congress should also weigh the impact on other issues, including safeguards for all USPS health plan fund assets by placing appropriate constraints on their asset allocations, such as limiting investments to Treasury securities and inflation-indexed Treasury securities or, if Congress chooses to permit investments in non-Treasury securities, constraints on the discount rate for prefunding purposes so as not to anticipate returns on risk-bearing assets in excess of those on Treasury securities before such returns have actually been achieved.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of May 2017, Congress had not enacted legislation that would create a U.S. Postal Service health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. Therefore, Congress had not fully addressed the impact of safeguards for all USPS health plan fund assets by placing appropriate constraints on their asset allocations. In September 2015, S.2051: Improving Postal Operations, Service, and Transparency Act of 2015 was introduced to the to the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. The bill requires all Medicare-eligible postal annuitants and employees enrolled in a U.S. Postal Service health plan to also enroll in Medicare, including parts A, B and D. This bill, however, has not yet been approved by the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Recommendation: A key matter for Congress to consider is whether or not to move forward with a USPS health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. If Congress decides to approve this proposal, then Congress should also weigh the impact on other issues, including standards for the disposition of any surplus health plan assets that reduce the risk of a new unfunded liability emerging in the future, standards such as amortizing any surplus to mirror the amortization of any unfunded liability, or using any surplus to offset normal cost payments.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of May 2017, Congress had not enacted legislation that would create a U.S. Postal Service health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. Consequently, Congress has not fully addressed the issue of standards for the disposition of any surplus health plan assets that reduce the risk of a new unfunded liability emerging in the future, such as amortizing any surplus to mirror the amortization of any unfunded liability, or using any surplus to offset normal cost payments.
    Recommendation: A key matter for Congress to consider is whether or not to move forward with a USPS health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. If Congress decides to approve this proposal, then Congress should also weigh the impact on other issues, including designation or creation of an independent entity responsible for the selection of actuarial assumptions used to annually determine the funded status of USPS's health plan for purposes of determining prefunding payments.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of May 2017, Congress had not enacted legislation that would create a U.S. Postal Service health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. Consequently, Congress has not fully addressed the designation or creation of an independent entity responsible for the selection of actuarial assumptions used to annually determine the funded status of USPS's health plan for purposes of determining prefunding payments.
    Recommendation: A key matter for Congress to consider is whether or not to move forward with a USPS health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. If Congress decides to approve this proposal, then Congress should also weigh the impact on other issues, including protections for postal employees and retirees that are comparable to those under FEHBP, including a formula for USPS retirees' contribution to the costs of their health coverage.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of May 2017, Congress had not enacted legislation that would create a U.S. Postal Service health plan that would result in an increase in retirees' use of Medicare. Consequently, Congress has not fully addressed the issue of protections for postal employees and retirees that are comparable to those under FEHBP, including a formula for USPS retirees' contribution to the costs of their health coverage.