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    Subject Term: "Medicare spending"

    4 publications with a total of 9 open recommendations including 3 priority recommendations
    Director: Cosgrove, James C
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To determine the suitability of Medicare's Part B drug payment rate methodology for drugs with coupon programs, Congress should consider (1) granting CMS the authority to collect data from drug manufacturers on coupon discounts for Part B drugs paid based on ASP, and (2) requiring the agency to periodically collect these data and report on the implications that coupon programs may have for this methodology.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: When we determine what steps the Congress has taken, we will provide updated information.
    Director: James Cosgrove
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To help the Department of Health and Human Services ensure accuracy in Part B drug payment rates, Congress should consider requiring all manufacturers of Part B drugs paid at ASP, not only those with Medicaid drug rebate agreements, to submit sales price data to CMS, and ensure that CMS has authority to request source documentation to periodically validate all such data.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of August 2017, no action has been taken on this Matter for Congressional Consideration.
    Recommendation: CMS should periodically verify the sales price data submitted by a sample of drug manufacturers by requesting source documentation from manufacturers to corroborate the reported data, either directly or by working with the HHS Office of Inspector General as necessary.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In its comments on a draft of this report, HHS concurred with this recommendation. HHS stated that it will continue to work with the Office of Inspector General (OIG) as appropriate to collect source documentation from drug manufacturers and take action as may be warranted. HHS also stated that OIG reviews and compares the submitted average sales price (ASP) to the average manufacturer price (AMP) for Medicare Part B drugs and CMS has the authority to adjust ASP-based payment amounts when the difference between the two rates reaches a certain threshold. We do not consider this recommendation closed because CMS only collects source documentation from manufacturers under very limited circumstances (e.g., when there are obvious inconsistencies in the data submitted by manufacturers). CMS does not periodically request source documentation, such as sales invoices, from a sample of drug manufacturers to verify that the reported data reflect actual sales prices. As of August 17, 2017, CMS has not provided any additional information about actions to address this recommendation.
    Director: Cosgrove, James C
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    3 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred anatomic pathology services and help CMS avoid unnecessary increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should insert a self-referral flag on Medicare Part B claim forms and require providers to indicate whether the anatomic pathology services for which the provider bills Medicare are self-referred or not.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June 2013, we recommended that the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) insert a self-referral flag on Medicare Part B claim forms and require providers to indicate whether the anatomic pathology services for which the provider bills Medicare are self-referred or not. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) did not concur with this recommendation, noting that CMS does not believe that this recommendation will address overutilization that occurs as a result of self-referral. We continue to believe that such a flag on Part B claims would likely be the easiest and most cost-effective way for CMS to identify self-referred anatomic pathology services and monitor the behavior of those providers who self-refer these services. As of June 2017, CMS has not provided any additional information about actions to address this recommendation.
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred anatomic pathology services and help CMS avoid unnecessary increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should determine and implement an approach to ensure the appropriateness of biopsy procedures performed by self-referring providers.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June 2013, we recommended that the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implement an approach to ensure the appropriateness of biopsy procedures performed by self-referring providers. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) does not concur with this recommendation and does not believe it would address overutilization that occurs as a result of self-referral. HHS noted that it would be difficult to make recommendations regarding whether anatomic pathology services are appropriate without reviewing a large number of claims. We continue to believe that it is important for CMS to monitor the self-referral of anatomic pathology services on an ongoing basis and determine if those services are inappropriate or unnecessary. We also continue to believe this can be achieved without reviewing a large number of claims. CMS could, for example, consider performing targeted audits of providers that perform a higher average number of biopsy procedures compared to providers of the same specialty treating similar numbers of Medicare beneficiaries. As of June 2017, CMS has not provided any additional information about actions to address this recommendation.
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred anatomic pathology services and help CMS avoid unnecessary increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should develop and implement a payment approach for anatomic pathology services that would limit the financial incentives associated with referring a higher number of specimens--or anatomic pathology services--per biopsy procedure.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June 2013, we recommended that the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) develop and implement a payment approach for anatomic pathology services under the Physician Fee Schedule that would limit the financial incentives associated with referring a higher number of specimens--anatomic pathology services--per biopsy procedure. Although health care providers have discretion in determining the number of tissue samples from biopsy procedures that become specimens (anatomic pathology services), CMS's current payment system under the Physician Fee Schedule provides a financial incentive for providers to refer more specimens per biopsy procedure. Specifically, CMS pays for each specimen that a provider submits to be analyzed. HHS indicated that it concurred with our recommendation and that it had addressed this recommendation by reducing payment for the most commonly furnished anatomic pathology service (Current Procedural Terminology [CPT] code 88305) by approximately 30 percent in calendar year 2013. However, CMS's payment reduction did not change the financial incentive providers have to refer more specimens per biopsy procedure because they will still be paid separately for each specimen submitted. We continue to believe that CMS should develop a payment approach that addresses this incentive. As of June 2017, CMS had not provided any additional information about actions it has taken to address this recommendation.
    Director: Cosgrove, James C
    Phone: (202)512-7029

    3 open recommendations
    including 3 priority recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred advanced imaging services and help CMS address the increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should insert a self-referral flag on its Medicare Part B claims form and require providers to indicate whether the advanced imaging services for which a provider bills Medicare are self-referred or not.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: HHS did not concur with this recommendation, noting that CMS did not think this recommendation would be effective in addressing overutilization resulting from self-referral and that it would be complex to administer. We continue to believe that such a flag on Part B claims would likely be the easiest and most cost-effective way for CMS to identify self-referred advanced imaging services and monitor the behavior of those providers who self-refer these services even though the agency has no plans to take further action. As of October 2016, CMS has not provided any additional information about actions to address this recommendation.
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred advanced imaging services and help CMS address the increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should determine and implement a payment reduction for self-referred advanced imaging services to recognize efficiencies when the same provider refers and performs a service.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: HHS did not concur with this recommendation, noting that CMS did not believe that a payment reduction would address overutilization that occurs as a result of self-referral and that the agency's multiple procedure payment reduction policy for advanced imaging already captures efficiencies inhering in providing multiple advanced imaging services by the same physician. Further, CMS officials stated that providers in self-referring arrangements could avoid this reduction by having one provider refer an advanced imaging service while having another perform the service. Finally, CMS questioned whether implementing our recommendation would violate the Medicare statute prohibiting paying a differential by physician specialty for the same service. Our recommendation, however, refers to specific self-referral arrangements in which the same provider refers and performs an imaging service, and therefore would not be addressed by CMS's multiple procedure payment reduction policy. As noted in our report, this payment reduction would affect about 10 percent of advanced imaging services referred by self-referring providers. In addition, while CMS raised questions about whether implementing our recommendation would violate Medicare's prohibition on paying a differential by physician specialty for the same service, the agency did not indicate how it would do so as of October 2016. We continue to believe that CMS should determine and implement a payment reduction to recognize efficiencies for advanced imaging services referred and performed by the same provider even though, as of October 2016, the agency has no plans to take further action.
    Recommendation: In order to improve CMS's ability to identify self-referred advanced imaging services and help CMS address the increases in these services, the Administrator of CMS should determine and implement an approach to ensure the appropriateness of advanced imaging services referred by self-referring providers.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: HHS noted that it would consider this recommendation. The Secretary of HHS has the authority to establish a program to promote the use of appropriate use criteria - criteria that are evidenced-based (to the extent feasible) and that assist professionals to make the most appropriate treatment decisions for a specified clinical condition - for advanced imaging services under the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. CMS has begun developing its appropriate use criteria program (e.g., in November 2015, CMS established criteria to identify Qualified Provider Led Entities that are responsible for developing appropriate use criteria and has since selected Qualified Provider Led Entities), but full implementation of the program will not occur until at least January 1, 2018. If it - and the subsequent prior authorization program that incorporates appropriate use criteria - are implemented broadly enough (i.e., they ensure the appropriateness of advanced imaging services by all physicians, including those who self-refer), we could close the recommendation.