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    Subject Term: "Job creation"

    2 publications with a total of 5 open recommendations
    Director: Gambler, Rebecca S
    Phone: (202) 512-8777

    3 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To strengthen USCIS's EB-5 Program fraud prevention, detection, and mitigation capabilities, and to more accurately and comprehensively assess and report program outcomes and the overall economic benefits of the program, the Director of USCIS should plan and conduct regular future fraud risk assessments of the EB-5 Program.

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security: United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is responsible for administering the Employment-Based Fifth Preference Immigrant Investor Program (EB-5 Program). In 2015, we reviewed the EB-5 program to determine if USCIS assesses fraud and other related risks facing the program. We found that USCIS had collaborated with its interagency partners to assess fraud and national security risks in the program in fiscal years 2012 and 2015 but that these assessments were onetime efforts that did not have documented plans to conduct regular future risk assessments, in accordance with fraud prevention practices, which could help inform efforts to identify and address evolving program risks. To strengthen the program's fraud prevention, detection, and mitigation capabilities, we recommended that USCIS plan and conduct regular future fraud risk assessments. USCIS concurred with the recommendation, stating that it will continue to conduct at least one fraud, national security, or intelligence assessment on an aspect of the program annually. In September 2015, USCIS stated that the Fraud Detection and National Security Directorate unit of its Immigrant Investor Program (IPO) will conduct its next fraud, national security, and intelligence assessment in FY 2016 and one assessment annually thereafter. In an August 2016 update, USCIS stated that it had conducted a national security assessment, the draft of which was under review by management, to be finalized by September 30, 2016. We will continue to monitor USCIS's efforts to ensure that the agency finalizes this assessment and documents plans to conduct future fraud assessments on a regular basis.
    Recommendation: To strengthen USCIS's EB-5 Program fraud prevention, detection, and mitigation capabilities, and to more accurately and comprehensively assess and report program outcomes and the overall economic benefits of the program, the Director of USCIS should develop a strategy to expand information collection, including considering the increased use of interviews at the I-829 phase as well as requiring the additional reporting of information in applicant and petitioner forms.

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security: United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In 2015, we evaluated the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Employment-Based Fifth Preference Immigrant Investor Program (EB-5 Program) to determine the extent to which the agency had addressed any identified fraud risks in the program. We found that USCIS had identified unique fraud risks in the program and had taken certain steps to address and enhance its fraud risk management efforts, including establishing a dedicated entity to oversee these efforts. However, we found that USCIS's information systems and processes limited its ability to collect and use data on EB-5 Program participants to comprehensively address fraud risks in the program. To strengthen the program's fraud mitigation capabilities, we recommended that USCIS develop a strategy to expand information collection, including considering the increased use of interviews at the application for permanent residency (form I-829) phase as well as requiring the additional reporting of information in applicant and petitioner forms. USCIS concurred with the recommendation, stating that IPO will develop a strategy to enhance and expand information collection, including publishing revised EB-5 application and petition forms, and considering the use of interviews. In a September 2015 update to this recommendation, USCIS stated that it had begun internal discussions for developing a comprehensive strategy to incorporate interviews into various stages of the EB-5 process, including the I-829 phase. In addition, USCIS was implementing a comprehensive approach for revising all EB-5 specific forms (I-526, I-924, and I-924A) to improve program integrity and data collection. USCIS expects the revised forms to be available after December 31, 2015. In an August 2016 update, USCIS stated that it has revised Forms I-924, I-924A, and I-526, and anticipated revising Forms I-924 and I-924A by November 2016 and Form I-829 by March 2017. USCIS also stated that IPO had initiated a new process to allow interview of Form I-829 petitioners by video conference, and planned to develop a comprehensive interview strategy based on the results of initial and future interviews as well as other relevant information. We will continue to monitor USCIS's efforts to develop and implement this more comprehensive EB-5 data collection strategy.
    Recommendation: To strengthen USCIS's EB-5 Program fraud prevention, detection, and mitigation capabilities, and to more accurately and comprehensively assess and report program outcomes and the overall economic benefits of the program, the Director of USCIS should track and report data that immigrant investors report, and the agency verifies on its program forms for total investments and jobs created through the EB-5 Program.

    Agency: Department of Homeland Security: United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In 2015, we evaluated the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)'s capacity to verify job creation and to use a valid and reliable methodology to report the economic benefits of its Employment-Based Fifth Preference Immigrant Investor Program (EB-5 Program). We found that over time USCIS had increased its capacity to verify job creation by increasing the size and expertise of its workforce and by providing clarifying guidance and training, among other actions. However, we found that USCIS's methodology for reporting program outcomes and overall economic benefits of the EB-5 Program was not valid and reliable because it may understate or overstate program benefits in certain instances as it was based on the minimum program requirements of 10 jobs and a $500,000 investment per investor, instead of the number of jobs and investment amounts collected by USCIS on individual EB-5 Program forms. To more accurately and comprehensively assess and report the overall economic benefits of the program, we recommended that USCIS track and report data that immigrant investors report, and the agency verifies on its program forms for total investments and jobs created. USCIS concurred with this recommendation, stating that IPO will develop a plan to collect and aggregate additional data regarding EB-5 investment amounts and job creation, including revising USCIS data systems and processes, as appropriate. In a September 2015 update, USCIS further stated that IPO officials had already met with officials from the USCIS Office of information Technology (OIT) on August 25, 2015, to discuss EB-5 data requirements, and that IPO is reviewing the fields in the Intranet Computer Linked Application Information Management System (iCLAIMS) database used for maintaining EB-5 and other immigration program data, to define data entry requirements. Once that is completed, USCIS stated that IPO will work with OIT to discuss any system changes needed to reliably aggregate data regarding EB-5 program investment amounts and job creation. In an August 2016 update, USCIS stated that through regular meetings with OIT, IPO has identified the assets needed to develop a case management system to meet the complex data needs of the EB-5 program. This system, which will be compatible with USCIS's electronic immigration system, is tentatively projected to be completed in FY 2017. We will continue to monitor USCIS's efforts to develop a system that will enable it to accurately and comprehensively assess and report the overall economic benefits of the program.
    Director: Cosgrove, James C
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: As CMS continues to implement and refine the Value Modifier program to enhance the quality and efficiency of physician care, the Administrator of CMS should consider whether certain private-sector practices could broaden and strengthen the program's incentives. Specifically, she should consider (1) developing at least some performance benchmarks that reward physicians for improvement as well as for meeting absolute performance benchmarks, and (2) making Value Modifier adjustments more timely in order to better reflect recent physician performance.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: CMS stated that it is working to implement GAO's recommendation. Previously, the agency noted that it would investigate accelerating the timeline of the Value Modifier, keeping in mind reporting requirements, data availability, and the need for valid and reliable measures. In addition, Congress passed legislation in 2015 requiring CMS to incorporate certain benchmark methodology and timing aspects that reflect GAO's 2013 recommendation, and the agency is replacing the Value Modifier with a new merit-based incentive payment system. CMS's efforts may, in time, address GAO recommendations to improve performance benchmarks and the timeliness of payment adjustments, but they have yet to be fully implemented. As of August 2017, CMS officials have not implemented this recommendation. GAO considers it to be open. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Recommendation: The Administrator should develop a strategy to reliably measure the performance of solo and small physician practices, such as by aggregating their performance data to create informal practice groups.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: CMS stated that it is working to implement GAO's recommendation to measure the performance of solo and small physician practices. CMS included in its Value Modifier policies the amount of payment adjustments for solo and small physician practices, along with the parameters for measurement. In addition, Congress passed legislation in 2015 requiring CMS to establish a process to allow solo and physician practices under ten eligible professionals to be measured in a virtual group, and the agency is replacing the Value Modifier with a new merit-based incentive payment system. CMS's efforts may, in time, address GAO recommendations to reliably measure the performance of solo and small physician practices, but they have yet to be fully implemented. As of August 2017, CMS officials have not implemented this recommendation. GAO considers it to be open. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.