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    Subject Term: "Health insurance cost control"

    4 publications with a total of 7 open recommendations including 1 priority recommendation
    Director: Cosgrove, James C
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To increase beneficiaries' awareness of providers' financial interest in a particular treatment, Congress should consider directing the Secretary of Health and Human Services to require providers who self-refer IMRT services to disclose to their patients that they have a financial interest in the service.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2013, to increase beneficiaries' awareness of providers' financial interest in a particular treatment, we suggested that Congress should consider directing the Secretary of Health and Human Services to require providers who self-refer IMRT services to disclose to their patients that they have a financial interest in the service. As of June 2017, Congress has not implemented this suggestion.
    Recommendation: The Administrator of CMS should insert a self-referral flag on its Medicare Part B claims form, require providers to indicate whether the IMRT service for which a provider bills Medicare is self-referred, and monitor the effects that self-referral has on costs and beneficiary treatment selection.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2013, we recommended that the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) insert a self-referral flag on its Medicare Part B claims form, require providers to indicate whether the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) service for which a provider bills Medicare is self-referred, and monitor the effects that self-referral has on costs and beneficiary treatment selection. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) did not concur with this recommendation, noting that CMS does not believe that this recommendation will address overutilization that occurs as a result of self-referral, would be complex to administer, and may have unintended consequences. We continue to believe that such a flag on Part B claims would likely be the easiest and most cost-effective way for CMS to identify self-referred IMRT services and monitor the effects of self-referral. As of June 2017, CMS has not provided any additional information about actions it has taken to address this recommendation.
    Director: Kohn, Linda T
    Phone: (202)512-3000

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: As HHS implements its current and forthcoming efforts to make transparent price information available to consumers, HHS should determine the feasibility of making estimates of complete costs of health care services available to consumers through any of these efforts.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In May 2013, CMS released average inpatient hospital charge information for more than 3,000 hospitals that receive Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System payments for the 100 most frequently billed discharges using DRGs from FY2011 and corresponding average Medicare payments. Shortly thereafter CMS also released outpatient charges. In April 2014, CMS also released data on payments to physicians under Medicare part B. This represents an effort to provide price transparency, although these are not complete cost estimates according to our definition in this report. As of September 2015, we are awaiting an update from HHS on the status of this recommendation. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Recommendation: As HHS implements its current and forthcoming efforts to make transparent price information available to consumers, HHS should determine, as appropriate, the next steps for making estimates of complete costs of health care services available to consumers.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of September 2015, we are awaiting an update from HHS on the status of this recommendation. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Director: Iritani, Katherine
    Phone: (212) 512-3000

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: Congress may wish to consider requiring increased attention to fiscal responsibility in the approval of section 1115 Medicaid demonstrations by requiring the Secretary of HHS to improve the demonstration review process through steps such as (1) clarifying criteria for reviewing and approving states' proposed spending limits, (2) better ensuring that valid methods are used to demonstrate budget neutrality, and (3) documenting and making public material explaining the basis for any approvals.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of July 2015, no legislation on this topic had been passed, although at least one bill had been introduced in Congress that would make budget neutrality a statutory requirement for Medicaid demonstrations.The House Energy and Commerce Committee held a hearing in June 2015 examining HHS's approval of spending under Medicaid demonstrations. In addition, the House Oversight and Government Reform and House Energy and Commerce Committees had sent letters to the Administration inquiring as to how HHS was responding to GAO findings and recommendations to improve the process and methods used to set demonstration spending limits.
    Recommendation: Congress may wish to consider addressing whether demonstrations that allow states to operate public managed care organizations and retain excess revenue to support programs previously funded by the state--including the Vermont demonstration--are within the scope of the Secretary of HHS's authority under section 1115 of the Social Security Act.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of July 2015, Congress had not passed legislation in response to our matter for congressional consideration.
    Director: Iritani, Katherine M
    Phone: (202)512-7059

    1 open recommendations
    including 1 priority recommendation
    Recommendation: To meet its fiduciary responsibility of ensuring that section 1115 waivers are budget neutral, the Secretary of Health and Human services should better ensure that valid methods are used to demonstrate budget neutrality, by developing and implementing consistent criteria for consideration of section 1115 demonstration waiver proposals.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: HHS has generally disagreed with this recommendation. However, we have reiterated the need for increased attention to the fiscal responsibility in the approval of the section 1115 Medicaid demonstrations in subsequent 2008 and 2013 reports (GAO-08-87 and GAO-13-384). Although HHS has not issued a written budget neutrality policy as of October 2016, it has taken steps to change some aspects of methods states can use to determine budget neutrality and demonstration spending limits. The new methods are intended to result in more appropriate demonstration spending limits. For example, according to CMS officials, starting in May 2016, the agency began reducing the amount of accumulated savings that states can carryover when demonstrations are renewed, which was previously unlimited. We are continuing to monitor the effect of the recent changes. The recent changes did not address all of the questionable methods we have identifed in our reports.