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    Subject Term: "Drug abuse"

    7 publications with a total of 16 open recommendations
    Director: Diana Maurer
    Phone: (202) 512-8777

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To better ensure grantees' compliance with the Drug-Free Communities Support Program's statutory requirements and to strengthen monitoring of grantee activities, SAMHSA should develop an action plan with time frames for addressing any deficiencies it finds through its reviews and making systemic changes to mitigate deficiencies on a prospective basis to strengthen the grant monitoring process.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Public Health Service: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of April 2017, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA is currently in the process of implementing routine audits of all its grant files. SAMHSA will also conduct an audit specifically of DFC files to ensure compliance by the end of summer 2017. Additionally, SAMHSA will offer regular training to government project officers (GPO) on grant report requirements and will ensure DFC GPO participation. Finally, SAMHSA is actively implementing the Grants Enterprise Management System to streamline the grants management process and make the process for maintaining grant files automated. By the end of fall 2017, all newly awarded DFC grants will be in this system. By the end of fall 2018, all active DFC grants will utilize this system.
    Recommendation: To better ensure grantees' compliance with the Drug-Free Communities Support Program's statutory requirements and to strengthen monitoring of grantee activities, SAMHSA should develop and implement a method for ensuring that the grantee status reports it provides to ONDCP are complete and accurate.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Public Health Service: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of April 2017, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA will develop a plan to ensure complete and accurate information is provided to ONDCP by the end of summer 2017.
    Director: Seto Bagdoyan
    Phone: (202) 512-6722

    5 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop a legislative proposal requesting authority to require SSNs for all individuals, regardless of whether they hold an individual or business registration.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us it is exploring the possibility and practicality of implementing policy or rule changes that would require Social Security Numbers (SSN) from all persons applying for a DEA Registration as a practitioner or mid-level practitioner. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop policies and procedures to validate SSNs and apply the policies and procedures to all new and existing SSNs in the CSA2; such an approach could involve collaborating with SSA to assess the feasibility of checking registrants' SSNs against the Enumeration Verification System.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that it had initiated discussions with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to determine the legality and feasibility of using SSA's Enumeration Verification System (EVS) to verify SSNs provided during the registration process. DEA stated that SSA has informed both GAO and DEA that its current legislative authorities do not authorize SSA to provide the information to DEA. As a a result, DEA stated that legislative action will be required to allow DEA additional access to EVS. As stated in our report, the use of EVS is one possible approach to validate SSNs. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should develop a legislative proposal to request access to SSA's full death file.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that the Social Security Administration (SSA) determined that it cannot provide data from the full death file to DEA under existing law for use in administering the DEA Registration Process. DEA also said that if legislative changes allow DEA full access to SSA's full death file, DEA will work with SSA to ensure implementation of the new legislative authority. We continue to believe that DEA should develop a legislative proposal to request access to SSA's full death file and we will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should identify and implement a cost-effective approach to monitor state licensure and disciplinary actions taken against its registrants; such an approach could include using data sources that contain this information, such as the National Practitioner Data Bank or the Federation of State Medical Boards.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us that currently, the Controlled Substance Act and its implementing regulations do not specifically give DEA authority to access state medical licensing boards' databases. DEA also said that it met with representatives of the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) to develop a process that will allow DEA to accomplish the objectives GAO articulated in the draft report. Specifically, DEA said that it is exploring use of the FSMB service to verify the existence and status of state licenses to ensure all applicants for registration who are Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Osteopathy, or Physician Assistants (in the states that provide this data to FSMB), meet the requirements to possess a DEA Registration. To implement the above described actions, DEA stated it will need to enter into an agreement with FSMB to provide this data in a format that allows real-time access to the data and accommodates the large numbers of applicants for DEA Registrations. DEA also said it obtained information from FSMB to begin the agreement process and is currently obtaining information on data elements that can be used to test user account codes to flag records in the FSMB. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Recommendation: To help ensure that practitioners who may be ineligible do not possess a controlled substance registration and that practitioners who pose an increased risk of illicit diversion are identified, the Acting Administrator of DEA should take additional actions to strengthen verification controls. Specifically, the Acting Administrator of DEA should assess the cost and feasibility of developing procedures for monitoring registrants' criminal backgrounds, such as conducting matches against federal law-enforcement databases, and document decisions about the approach chosen.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration
    Status: Open

    Comments: In August 2016, DEA told us they are in the process of determining the feasibility of implementing actions that would permit DEA to comply with the recommendation utilizing the current legal framework and within reasonable cost parameters. DEA also said that the large volume of DEA registrations and the large number of applications received monthly present extensive technical and fiscal challenges with addressing this recommendation. We will continue to monitor DEA's progress in implementing this recommendation.
    Director: Linda Kohn
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    3 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to strengthen DEA's communication with and guidance for registrants and associations representing registrants, as well as supporting the Office of Diversion Control's mission of preventing diversion while ensuring an adequate and uninterrupted supply of controlled substances for legitimate medical needs, the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control should identify and implement means of cost-effective, regular communication with distributor, pharmacy, and practitioner registrants, such as through listservs or web-based training.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration: Operations Division: Office of Diversion Control: Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of March 2017, DEA officials reported that the agency was taking steps towards addressing this recommendation. In particular, DEA officials reported that they were in the process of developing a method to deliver information about registrant responsibilities through DEA's registration website, which registrants could access annually when they update their registration. DEA officials also reported that they would consider a method for registrants to subscribe to get email updates when new information is posted to Diversion Control Division website. We plan to continue to monitor the agency's efforts in this area, and this recommendation remains open.
    Recommendation: In order to strengthen DEA's communication with and guidance for registrants and associations representing registrants, as well as supporting the Office of Diversion Control's mission of preventing diversion while ensuring an adequate and uninterrupted supply of controlled substances for legitimate medical needs, the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control should solicit input from distributors, or associations representing distributors, and develop additional guidance for distributors regarding their roles and responsibilities for suspicious orders monitoring and reporting.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration: Operations Division: Office of Diversion Control: Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control
    Status: Open

    Comments: In March 2017, DEA officials reported that the agency had worked with its Suspicious Orders Task Force to develop a draft Suspicious Orders regulation. They reported that the draft regulation was undergoing internal DEA review, but that it was uncertain when the draft regulation would be published in the Federal Register. We plan to continue to monitor the agency's efforts in this area, and this recommendation remains open.
    Recommendation: In order to strengthen DEA's communication with and guidance for registrants and associations representing registrants, as well as supporting the Office of Diversion Control's mission of preventing diversion while ensuring an adequate and uninterrupted supply of controlled substances for legitimate medical needs, the Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control should solicit input from pharmacists, or associations representing pharmacies and pharmacists, about updates and additions needed to existing guidance for pharmacists, and revise or issue guidance accordingly.

    Agency: Department of Justice: Drug Enforcement Administration: Operations Division: Office of Diversion Control: Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Diversion Control
    Status: Open

    Comments: In April 2016, DEA reported that it had worked with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy regarding issues raised during stakeholder discussions, which resulted in a March 2015 consensus document published by stakeholders entitled "Stakeholders' Challenges and Red Flag Warning Signs Related to Prescribing and Dispensing Controlled Substances." Additionally, in December 2016 DEA also described other ways in which the agency had been working with pharmacists or associations representing pharmacists to discuss their responsibilities, such as during regional one-day Pharmacy Diversion Awareness Conferences, and quarterly meetings with two pharmacy associations. In March 2017, DEA officials reported that while an update to the Pharmacist's Manual was still under way, they did not have an estimated completion date. We plan to continue to monitor the agency's efforts in this area, as well, and consequently this recommendation remains open.
    Director: Susan Fleming,
    Phone: (202) 512-2834

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: The Secretary of Transportation should direct the Administrator of NHTSA to identify actions--in addition to the agency's currently planned efforts--to support state efforts to increase public awareness of the dangers of drug-impaired driving. This effort should be undertaken in consultation with ONDCP, HHS, state highway-safety offices, and other interested parties as needed.

    Agency: Department of Transportation
    Status: Open

    Comments: NHTSA met with ONDCP, HHS, and GHSA in March 2016 and discussed what consumer research has been done and education materials have been used in raising awareness for the drug-impaired driving issue. NHTSA completed marijuana creative concept focus group market research in the Fall of 2016; however, the findings from this research were inconclusive. NHTSA plans to determine next steps and develop a new strategy in communicating on this challenging topic by Spring 2017. NHTSA anticipates conducting additional market research that will provide the direction for the development of creative materials by Fall 2017.
    Director: Vijay A. D'Souza
    Phone: (202) 512-7114

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that efforts to address prenatal opioid use and NAS are systematically and effectively planned and coordinated across the federal government, the Director of ONDCP should document the process, including discussions held and information considered, of developing action items on prenatal opioid use and NAS. This may include documenting gaps that were considered in developing action items.

    Agency: Executive Office of the President: Office of National Drug Control Policy
    Status: Open

    Comments: In May 2017 and July 2017, ONDCP officials described the process used to develop the action items related to prenatal opioid use and NAS for the 2015 National Drug Control Strategy report. Specifically, officials described working directly with federal agencies to identify proposals for action items and review proposals during an interagency working group meeting in March 2015. However, ONDCP officials could not provide us any formal documentation, such as meeting minutes, showing the process used or what gaps were considered in developing the action items. ONDCP officials also told us the action items related to prenatal opioid use and NAS for the 2015 Strategy have been generally completed. No action items related to prenatal opioid use and NAS were included in the 2016 Strategy and ONDCP officials said they did not know whether any related action items will be included for the 2017 Strategy. We will update the status of this recommendation after future Strategy reports are published.
    Director: Crosse, Marcia G
    Phone: 202-512-3407

    3 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that federal efforts to prevent the abuse and misuse of prescription pain relievers are an effective and efficient use of limited government resources, the Director of ONDCP should establish outcome metrics and identify resources for conducting outcome evaluations for the national education campaigns about prescription drug abuse and safe storage and disposal proposed in the Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan.

    Agency: Office of National Drug Control Policy
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June, 2016, we requested an update from ONDCP on the status of its efforts to implement this recommendation. We have not received a response. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that federal efforts to prevent the abuse and misuse of prescription pain relievers are an effective and efficient use of limited government resources, the Director of ONDCP should develop and implement a plan to evaluate outcomes from the proposed national education campaigns.

    Agency: Office of National Drug Control Policy
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June, 2016, we requested an update from ONDCP on the status of its efforts to implement this recommendation. We have not received a response. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that federal efforts to prevent the abuse and misuse of prescription pain relievers are an effective and efficient use of limited government resources, the Director of ONDCP should ensure that federal agencies undertaking similar educational efforts leverage available resources and use coordination mechanisms to share information on the development of their efforts.

    Agency: Office of National Drug Control Policy
    Status: Open

    Comments: In June, 2016, we requested an update from ONDCP on the status of its efforts to implement this recommendation. We have not received a response. We will update the status of this recommendation when we receive additional information.
    Director: Siggerud, Katherine A
    Phone: (202)512-3000

    1 open recommendations
    Recommendation: Taking action to address the challenges FMCSA faces to ensure that its drug testing program detects drivers who are using illegal drugs, and to keep drivers who have tested positive off the road until they have completed the return-to-duty process, provides an opportunity to improve safety on the roads. In order to assist the Department of Transportation (DOT) and FMCSA in addressing these challenges, and thereby improving road safety, Congress may wish to consider adopting legislation to ban subversion products.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: On February 4, 2009, Representative Engel introduced the Drug Testing Integrity Act of 2009 in the House of Representatives. The Act would ban products designed to defraud drug tests. On February 15, 2011 Representative Engel re-introduced the bill, which was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and then to the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade. Representative Engel re-introduced the bill in the 113th Congress in May of 2013. However, the bill has not been reintroduced since.