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    Subject Term: "Child health services"

    3 publications with a total of 7 open recommendations including 1 priority recommendation
    Director: Kay E. Brown
    Phone: (202) 512-7215

    3 open recommendations
    including 1 priority recommendation
    Recommendation: The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services should direct the Office of Refugee Resettlement to develop a process to update its bed capacity framework on an annual basis to include the most recent data related to numbers of unaccompanied children who may be referred to its care and adjust its planning scenarios that guide its bed capacity as appropriate.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open
    Priority recommendation

    Comments: The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) developed a bed capacity framework for fiscal year 2016, and produced a FY 2017 bed capacity framework in June 2017. The frameworks include a discussion of the indicators, referrals and triggers ACF uses to monitor bed capacity, as well as the agency's framework for ensuring that it has sufficient capacity to meet its need for shelter beds and services.
    Recommendation: The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services should direct the Office of Refugee Resettlement to review its monitoring program to ensure that onsite visits are conducted in a timely manner, case files are systematically reviewed as part of or separate from onsite visits, and that grantees properly document the services they provide to children.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: HHS agreed with our recommendation. According to HHS, in the beginning of FY 2016, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) conducted a review of its monitoring procedures to develop uniform protocols for all ORR monitoring activities. In addition, ORR reported that it completed its scheduled monitoring visits for FY 2016. HHS reported that for FY 2017 and FY 2018 the UAC Program Monitoring Team will biannually monitor all of its ORR UAC care providers.
    Recommendation: The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services should direct the Office of Refugee Resettlement to develop a process to ensure all information collected through its existing post-release efforts are reliable and systematically collected so that they can be compiled in summary form and provide useful information to other entities internally and externally.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) created a new section in its unaccompanied children's policy guide that, among other things, includes case reporting, records management, retention, and information sharing requirements for post-release service providers. However, as of August 2017, case management functionality has not been built into ORR's UAC Portal, a web-based database that contains, among other things, intake, placement, and sponsor information, as well as individual service plans for the children. Also, the post-release service program does not yet have OMB-approved forms that ORR can require grantees use for reporting purposes. Nevertheless, ORR has collected and released data on Safety and Well-Being (SWB) follow-up calls that were made to children and their sponsors. In addition, ORR has developed a plan for collecting and analyzing National Call Center data.
    Director: Iritani, Katherine M
    Phone: (206)287-4820

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In light of the need for accurate and complete information on children's access to health services under Medicaid and CHIP, the requirement that states report information to CMS on certain aspects of their Medicaid and CHIP programs, and problems with accuracy and completeness in this state reporting, the Administrator of CMS should establish a plan, with goals and time frames, to review the accuracy and completeness of information reported on the CMS 416 and CHIP annual reports and ensure that identified problems are corrected.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In September 2016, CMS said that it was taking new steps to review data on children's access and quality of care by reviewing required reports that evaluate states' Medicaid managed care plans; however, these reports do not represent a consistent set of measures used by all states that CMS can use for oversight purposes. Accurate, complete, and reliable data for both Medicaid and CHIP are necessary for CMS's oversight of children's access to services. GAO considers this recommendation open.
    Recommendation: In light of the need for accurate and complete information on children's access to health services under Medicaid and CHIP, the requirement that states report information to CMS on certain aspects of their Medicaid and CHIP programs, and problems with accuracy and completeness in this state reporting, the Administrator of CMS should work with states to identify additional improvements that could be made to the CMS 416 and CHIP annual reports, including options for reporting on the receipt of services separately for children in managed care and fee-for-service delivery models, while minimizing reporting burden, and for capturing information on the CMS 416 relating to children's receipt of treatment services for which they are referred.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: In September 2016, CMS said that it had changed the instructions for completing the CMS 416 to provide more detailed guidance for states on capturing required information on the total number of children who were referred for treatment services. However, CMS is not planning to require states to submit information on whether children received the treatment services for which they were referred. We maintain that having ability to monitor receipt of treatment services, receipt of services in managed care separate from fee-for-service, and having data from all states is important to CMS oversight. GAO considers this recommendation open.
    Director: Iritani, Katherine M
    Phone: (206)287-4820

    2 open recommendations
    Recommendation: To enhance the provision of dental care to children covered by Medicaid and CHIP, and to help ensure that HHS's Insure Kids Now Web site is a useful tool to help connect children covered by Medicaid and CHIP with participating dentists who will treat them, the Secretary of HHS should establish a process to periodically verify that the dentist lists posted by states on the Insure Kids Now Web site are complete, usable, and accurate, and ensure that states and participating dentists have a common understanding of what it means for a dentist to indicate he or she can treat children with special needs.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: HHS has reported taking steps to improve the data on the Insure Kids Now website, including establishing an ongoing system to check that data are in the correct format and conducting validation surveys. HHS has also reported that CMS will provide technical assistance to low performing States and develop mechanisms to better identify providers that serve children with special health care needs. As of September 2017, CMS has not indicated that it has communicated with states and providers on what it means for a dentist to indicate he or she can treat children with special needs. We will leave this recommendation open until the agency takes steps to ensure that states and participating dentists have a common understanding of what it means for a dentist to indicate he or she can treat children with special needs.
    Recommendation: To enhance the provision of dental care to children covered by Medicaid and CHIP, and to help ensure that HHS's Insure Kids Now Web site is a useful tool to help connect children covered by Medicaid and CHIP with participating dentists who will treat them, the Secretary of HHS should require states to verify that dentists listed on the Insure Kids Now Web site have not been excluded from Medicaid and CHIP by the HHS-OIG, and periodically verify that excluded providers are not included on the lists posted by the states.

    Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
    Status: Open

    Comments: As of September 2017, CMS has not indicated the agency has required states to ensure that excluded providers are not listed on the Insure Kids Now website and has not indicated that the agency has taken steps to periodically verify that excluded providers are not listed. CMS has said that it relies on states to provide accurate lists of eligible dentists and that data issues prevent the agency from independently verifying that excluded providers are not included on the Insure Kids Now website. We continue to believe that CMS should require states to ensure that excluded providers are not listed on the website and periodically verify that excluded providers are not included on the lists posted by the states, so that the website does not present inaccurate information about providers available to serve Medicaid-covered children.