Reports & Testimonies

  • GAO’s recommendations database contains report recommendations that still need to be addressed.

    GAO’s recommendations help congressional and agency leaders prepare for appropriations and oversight activities, as well as help improve government operations. Recommendations remain open until they are designated as Closed-implemented or Closed-not implemented. You can explore open recommendations by searching or browsing.

    GAO's priority recommendations are those that we believe warrant priority attention. We sent letters to the heads of key departments and agencies, urging them to continue focusing on these issues. These recommendations are labeled as such. You can find priority recommendations by searching or browsing our open recommendations below, or through our mobile app.

  • Browse Open Recommendations

    Explore priority recommendations by subject terms or browse by federal agency

    Search Open Recommendations

    Search for a specific priority recommendation by word or phrase



  • Governing on the go?

    Our Priorities for Policy Makers app makes it easier for leaders to search our recommendations on the go.

    See the November 10th Press Release


  • Have a Question about a Recommendation?

    • For questions about a specific recommendation, contact the person or office listed with the recommendation.
    • For general information about recommendations, contact GAO's Audit Policy and Quality Assurance office at (202) 512-6100 or apqa@gao.gov.
  • « Back to Results List Sort by   

    Results:

    Subject Term: "Air sovereignty alert"

    1 publication with a total of 5 open recommendations
    Director: Lepore, Brian J
    Phone: (202) 512-4523

    5 open recommendations
    Recommendation: In order to ensure that the Air Force is taking action that addresses the long-term sustainability of ASA operations, Congress may wish to consider requiring the Secretary of the Air Force to fully implement the remaining actions identified in our 2009 report within a time period that Congress believes most prudent.

    Agency: Congress
    Status: Open

    Comments: The House Armed Services Committee has included an Aerospace Control Alert (Air Sovereignty Alert) related provision in the Fiscal Year 2013 National Defense Authorization bill that passed the House on May 18, 2012. The provision precluded any changes to the alert status of the 18 alert sites throughout the United States until the enactment of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 or September 30, 2013, whichever of the two dates was later. It also required DOD to submit (1) a consolidated budget exhibit detailing all aspects of the aerospace control alert mission and (2) a report on the cost-benefit analysis and risk-based assessment on the aerospace control alert structure. No further action has been taken on this Matter for Congressional Consideration.
    Recommendation: In order to implement a more-complete risk-based management approach that balances risk and costs for ASA operations, the Secretary of Defense should direct the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in coordination with the U.S. element of NORAD and U.S. Pacific Command, to develop performance measures for ASA operations and then use these measures to evaluate the mission and make adjustments, as warranted, on the basis of the performance-measure results.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: DOD partially concurred with the recommendation. DOD stated that it recognized the merit of measures of performance. Though it stated that each Military Department has long-established procedures and measures of performance to certify units as combat ready, DOD did not specify any such efforts related to NORAD and ASA operations.
    Recommendation: In order to implement a more-complete risk-based management approach that balances risk and costs for ASA operations, the Secretary of Defense should direct the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs, in coordination with the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to issue updated guidance, which includes a prioritized list of metropolitan areas and critical infrastructure that NORAD is supposed to protect.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: DOD partially concurred with this recommendation but has not provided information on what actions it may take to implement it.
    Recommendation: In order to implement a more-complete risk-based management approach that balances risk and costs for ASA operations, the Secretary of Defense should direct the U.S. element of NORAD to document the results of its risk assessments so that NORAD and DOD can identify trends over time.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: DOD partially concurred with the recommendation. DOD identified several NORAD studies or assessments-including a 2009 Collateral Damage Study and the 2010 ASA Basing Study-that are subject to trend analysis. We believe that NORAD's efforts to study or analyze different aspects of its missions are positive actions. However, while NORAD issued a one-time report to Congress in March 2011 that identified the results of its 2010 ASA Basing Study, a one-time study is not a trend analysis and the command has not documented the results of its analyses of the ASA model since that time.
    Recommendation: In order to accurately identify ASA expenditures and address other internal control weaknesses, the Secretary of Defense should direct the Secretary of the Air Force and the Director of the National Guard Bureau to issue guidance that (1) defines ASA programmatic and budgeting roles and responsibilities; (2) defines all expenditures that should be identified as ASA expenditures in financial-management systems; and (3) identifies the proper procedures to track ASA expenditures in their financial-management systems.

    Agency: Department of Defense
    Status: Open

    Comments: DOD partially concurred with the recommendation. In its response, DOD stated that it believes that programmatic and budgetary roles are clearly understood and well defined in DOD's planning, programming, budgeting, and execution process. It further stated that the Secretary of the Air Force is responsible for ASA programming and budgeting and that the Office of the Secretary of Defense will continue to work with the Secretary of the Air Force to clarify and standardize tracking and ASA expenditures. No further action has been reported.