Fire-Safe Accommodations:

Information on Federal Agencies' Compliance With P.L. 101-391 Lodging Requirements

GGD-96-135: Published: Jul 29, 1996. Publicly Released: Jul 29, 1996.

Additional Materials:

Contact:

Office of Public Affairs
(202) 512-4800
youngc1@gao.gov

Pursuant to a legislative requirement, GAO reviewed federal agencies' compliance with the Hotel and Motel Fire Safety Act of 1990's requirement that civilian federal employees on official travel stay in approved accommodations 65 percent of the time.

GAO found that: (1) 76 federal departments and agencies responded to GAO information requests regarding their compliance with the act's approved accommodations percentage requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1995; (2) 56 agencies reported compliance rates that ranged from 65 to 100 percent and 6 agencies reported compliance rates that ranged from 46 to 64 percent; (3) the 6 noncomplying agencies cited a variety of reasons for not meeting the accommodations requirement, such as the unavailability of approved accommodations, recordkeeping problems, and employees' lack of awareness of the requirement; (4) 14 agencies said that they did not collect the data needed to determine their approved accommodations percentage for FY 1995; (5) these agencies cited inadequate financial management and accounting systems, widely dispersed employees and offices, the lack of a current list of approved accommodations or resources to gather the needed data, exemption from the requirement, and agency termination as reasons for not collecting the data; (6) 7 of the 14 agencies are establishing procedures to collect data for future compliance reports; (7) the agencies used various methods to determine their approved accommodations percentage rates; and (8) it could not report on the compliance of the 20 agencies that did not respond to the information request.

Dec 1, 2016

Nov 28, 2016

Oct 31, 2016

Oct 26, 2016

Oct 13, 2016

Oct 12, 2016

Sep 30, 2016

Sep 29, 2016

Sep 27, 2016

Looking for more? Browse all our products here