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Testimony: 

Before the Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch, Committee on 
Appropriations, U.S. Senate: 

United States Government Accountability Office: 

GAO: 

For Release on Delivery Expected at 10:30 a.m. EDT: 

Tuesday, October 18, 2005: 

Capitol Visitor Center: 

Status of Schedule, Fire Protection, Cost, and Related Issues: 

Statement of Bernard L. Ungar, Director, Terrell Dorn, Assistant 
Director, Physical Infrastructure Issues: 

GAO-06-180T: 

Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee: 

We are pleased to be here today to assist the Subcommittee in 
monitoring progress on the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) project. Our 
remarks will focus on (1) the Architect of the Capitol's (AOC) progress 
in managing the project's schedule since the Subcommittee's September 
15 hearing on the project, (2) issues associated with the CVC's fire 
protection system, and (3) the project's costs and funding.[Footnote 1] 
Our ability to fully address these issues is limited by two important 
factors. First, AOC's sequence 2 construction contractor's--Manhattan 
Construction Company--September 2005 schedule reflects a number of 
significant changes, and AOC has not yet had the opportunity to fully 
evaluate these changes. Second, neither AOC nor its construction 
management contractor--Gilbane Building Company--has completed the 
evaluation of elements of the project schedule that we recommended 
during the Subcommittee's September 15 hearing. Thus, while we will 
discuss the schedule's status today, we will not be able to provide 
specific estimated completion dates until AOC and its construction 
management contractor complete their assessments and we have the 
opportunity to evaluate them. Similarly, while we will discuss the 
status of the project's costs and funding today, we will wait until the 
project schedule is fully reviewed and stabilized and we have had an 
opportunity to evaluate AOC's consultant's, McDonough Bolyard Peck 
(MBP), cost-estimation work before we comprehensively update our 
November 2004 estimate of the cost to complete the project. 

Our remarks today are based on our review of schedules and financial 
reports for the CVC project and related records maintained by AOC and 
its construction management contractor; our observations on the 
progress of work at the CVC construction site; and our discussions with 
CVC project staff (including AOC, its major CVC contractors, and 
representatives of MBP), AOC's Chief Fire Marshal, United States 
Capitol Police (USCP) representatives, and officials responsible for 
managing the Capitol Power Plant (CPP). We did not perform an audit; 
rather, we performed our work to assist Congress in conducting its 
oversight activities. 

In summary, AOC and its construction contractors have made progress in 
managing the schedule and accomplishing work since the Subcommittee's 
September 15 CVC hearing, but additional delays have been encountered. 
Work on all interior levels of the CVC, various sections of the House 
and Senate expansion spaces, the plaza, and the utility tunnel has 
continued. However, additional delays have occurred in a number of 
areas. For example, despite an increase in the number of stone masons 
working on the project in September, the project lost about 2 weeks on 
interior stone work installation and a similar amount of time on the 
utility tunnel. 

Moreover, some revisions have been made to project activities and 
schedules, but these revisions have not been fully evaluated. The 
sequence 2 contractor revised the manner in which the HVAC and fire 
protection systems' commissioning work and acceptance testing would be 
done, which changed this contractor's scheduled completion date for the 
base project to December 11, 2006, from a completion date of February 
26, 2007, in the contractor's August schedule. However, neither AOC nor 
its construction management contractor has had time to fully evaluate 
these revisions. In addition, AOC's construction management contractor 
has now integrated into the project's September 2005 schedule a number 
of recently prepared component schedules, including schedules for 
preparing for CVC operations and House and Senate expansion space 
construction. This integrated project schedule shows the base project 
as being ready for opening to the public by mid December 2006 and a 
completion date of February 26, 2007, for the House and Senate 
expansion spaces.[Footnote 2] However, neither AOC nor its construction 
management contractor has fully evaluated the activity durations or 
adequacy of resource levels shown in the base project's schedule as we 
recommended in our September 15 statement. Also, the September 2005 
schedule does not yet fully reflect input from AOC's Chief Fire Marshal 
on commissioning or testing and inspection activities. Thus, we are not 
now in a position to estimate a specific completion date, and our views 
should be regarded as preliminary at this time. With this qualification 
in mind, we have not seen recent evidence that would change our 
preliminary view that a base project completion date in 2006 will be 
difficult to achieve and that construction completion in early to mid 
2007 is more likely unless AOC and its contractors take extraordinary 
action or change the project's scope, which could result in additional 
costs to the Government. Our view is based on the schedule slippages 
that have already occurred, the views of project personnel that several 
activities (such as interior wall stone installation and interior 
finish work) are likely to take longer than shown in the schedule, the 
large number of activities that the current project schedule shows as 
being at risk of causing the project's completion date to slip, and the 
risks and uncertainties that continue to face the project. While we 
view the increased number of stone masons as quite positive, it is not 
clear whether the contractor will be able to maintain a sufficiently 
high number of masons on the site or whether sufficient stone supplies 
will be available on time given the problems that have been experienced 
in this regard. AOC and its construction manager expect to have their 
evaluations of the sequence 2 contractor's schedule changes, scheduled 
activity durations, and proposed resource levels done by the end of 
this year. We will re-evaluate the project schedule and inform the 
Subcommittee of our results after AOC and its construction management 
contractor have what they consider to be a reasonably stable integrated 
schedule. 

The design of the CVC's fire protection system has undergone a number 
of changes--largely to reconcile conflicts between security and life 
and fire safety requirements--and in a number of instances has been the 
focus of considerable debate among stakeholders (e.g. CVC project team 
members, AOC's Chief Fire Marshal and AOC fire protection engineers, 
and USCP representatives). Changes to the system's design and scope 
have resulted in about $900,000 in cost increases so far and could 
result in additional increased costs of about $4.4 million based on 
anticipated changes as of September 30, 2005. The bulk of the potential 
$5.3 million cost increase stems from two factors--a change in the 
manner smoke will be kept from egress stairwells that was requested by 
AOC's Chief Fire Marshal and agreed to by the stakeholders and which 
resolves a conflict between security and life and fire safety 
requirements, and a disagreement between AOC and a contractor over 
contract requirements for certain detection devices. The increased cost 
figure could change significantly, however, because some CVC project 
team members believe that the estimated costs for these changes are too 
high, costs for all proposed or anticipated changes have not yet been 
fully evaluated, and negotiations relative to the estimated $4.4 
million in anticipated changes have not been completed. We have 
discussed the costs associated with the stairwell change with AOC, and 
it has agreed to fully evaluate the situation before it executes any 
additional contract modifications for this change. Based on our 
discussions with the CVC project team, AOC's Chief Fire Marshal, and 
USCP representatives, it appears that the fire protection system design 
is now essentially complete and agreed to by all the stakeholders. 
Finally, coordination problems have existed between the CVC project 
team and AOC's Chief Fire Marshall in arranging for inspections of 
completed work, but steps are being taken to resolve the problems. 

We have not updated our interim estimate of a cost of between $525.6 
million and about $559 million to complete the project, which we 
reported at the Subcommittee's September 15 CVC hearing, because AOC's 
consultant just completed its updated cost estimate and we have not yet 
had the opportunity to evaluate it, and because the project schedule 
has not yet stabilized. As soon as we evaluate MBP's report and the 
project schedule stabilizes, we will begin our work to reassess the 
reasonableness of project completion dates and comprehensively update 
our cost-to-complete estimate. No additional funding beyond the $527.9 
million for CVC construction and the $7.8 million that remained 
available for CVC operations or construction that we reported at the 
Subcommittee's last CVC hearing has been provided for the CVC. 

Project Schedules Have Been Revised but Not Fully Evaluated: 

While work in several areas has moved forward since the Subcommittee's 
September 15 CVC hearing, additional delays have been encountered, and 
project schedules have been revised but not fully reviewed or 
evaluated. Construction work has continued on the CVC, the East Front, 
the plaza, the House and Senate expansion spaces, and the utility 
tunnel since the Subcommittee's September 15 hearing. For example, wall 
stone installation work has continued in the great hall, the 
orientation theaters, and the auditorium, and the number of stone 
masons working in the interior of the CVC has increased since mid 
August. Some stone masons worked on weekends between mid August and mid 
September. In addition, excavation, concrete, and piping work in the 
utility tunnel has been proceeding, as has mechanical, electrical, and 
plumbing work in the CVC. 

On the other hand, between the Subcommittee's September 15 hearing and 
October 12, the sequence 2 contractor completed work on only 3 of the 
11 activities we and AOC have been tracking for the Subcommittee. None 
of these activities had been completed by the target dates shown in the 
contractor's April 2005 baseline schedule, although one was completed 
by the date shown in the contractor's June 2005 schedule. (See app. I.) 
Furthermore, additional delays have occurred on interior and exterior 
stonework installation, the East Front, the utility tunnel, and the 
House connector tunnel. For example, according to AOC's construction 
management contractor, during September, the sequence 2 contractor 
gained only 12 workdays on critical interior stonework and 10 workdays 
on the utility tunnel out of a possible 21 days of work. According to 
the construction management contractor, stonework has been delayed due 
a shortage of stone masons, a lack of critical pieces of stone, the 
need to do remedial concrete work in the orientation theaters and along 
the exterior concrete walls and interior concrete floors of the 
auditorium, and delays in getting shop drawings for stonework on the 
East Front. According to AOC's construction management contractor, 
excavation work on First Street for the utility tunnel has been delayed 
due to unforeseen conditions and the need to stop work for the former 
Chief Justice's funeral at the Supreme Court, and unforeseen conditions 
have also delayed work on the House connector tunnel. 

During September, the sequence 2 contractor changed the manner in which 
the HVAC and Fire Protection system's commissioning work and acceptance 
testing would be done, with the potential result of a time savings. The 
changes largely involved re-sequencing work and doing work concurrently 
that the August schedule showed would be done sequentially. According 
to the contractor's revised schedule, these changes will result in an 
improvement of over 60 workdays and bring the scheduled completion date 
for this work to December 11, 2006, compared to the February 26, 2007, 
date shown in the August schedule. However, these changes have not yet 
been fully evaluated. AOC and its construction management contractor 
are reviewing the changes, as is AOC's Chief Fire Marshal. AOC and its 
construction management contractor believe it will take about 30 to 60 
days to complete their assessments, and AOC's Chief Fire Marshal 
believes that he may have his evaluation done before the end of 
October. 

Altogether, the construction management contractor has identified a 
total of 11 critical activity paths in the September schedule that will 
extend the base project's completion date beyond AOC's September 15, 
2006, target date if expected lost time cannot be recovered or further 
delays cannot be prevented. In addition to the critical paths related 
to the HVAC system and the fire alarm system that are discussed above, 
examples of other base project critical path activities included in the 
contractor's September schedule are utility tunnel and piping, 
stonework in the East Front, interior wall stone in such areas as the 
orientation theaters and atria, stonework in the auditorium and exhibit 
gallery, millwork and casework installation in the orientation theaters 
and atria, fabrication and installation of bronze doors, and penthouse 
mechanical work. Of the 11 critical activity paths in the September 
schedule, completion dates for 4 paths improved compared to the August 
schedule, but completion dates for the other 7 paths, including all of 
the stonework paths, slipped. For example, according to the 
construction management contractor, the September schedule shows all of 
the work associated with the fire alarm testing critical path being 
completed by November 22, 2006, an improvement over the August 
schedule's date of February 26, 2007; the September schedule also shows 
all of the work associated with the interior auditorium wall stone 
critical path being completed by December 12, 2005, more than a month 
later than the August schedule's date of November 2, 2005. The sequence 
2 contractor's September 2005 schedule indicates that construction work 
on the base CVC will be essentially complete by September 15, 2006, and 
that remaining work between that date and December 11, 2006, will 
largely consist of testing, balancing, and commissioning the HVAC 
system; testing and inspecting the fire protection system; punch-list 
work; and preparing for operations. 

Most of the activities discussed above are among the activities we 
previously identified as likely having optimistic durations, suggesting 
that it could take even longer to complete them than shown in the 
project schedule. These activities served as the basis for the 
recommendation we made to AOC during the Subcommittee's September 15 
hearing that AOC rigorously evaluate the durations for the activities 
shown in the project schedule. According to AOC, it has not yet 
completed this evaluation. Moreover, we continue to believe that having 
such a large number of critical activity paths complicates project 
management and makes on-time completion more difficult. 

AOC's construction management contractor has continued to integrate 
various component schedules into the CVC construction and summary 
schedules as they have been completed, and the integrated schedule 
contains about 6,500 activities. Consequently, AOC now has a summary 
schedule that integrates the completion of CVC and House and Senate 
expansion space construction with preparations necessary for opening 
the CVC to the public. This integrated summary schedule shows CVC 
construction as well as the activities necessary for opening the CVC to 
the public being completed by mid December 2006, the time AOC proposed 
last month for opening the CVC to the public. That is, AOC expects 
construction work on the base CVC project to be substantially completed 
by September 15, 2006, but expects such work as HVAC commissioning, 
fire protection system testing and inspection, punch-list work, and 
operations preparations work to be ongoing until December 15, 2006. 
According to AOC's sequence 2 and construction management contractors, 
it is not yet clear whether expansion space construction will have 
progressed to the point where temporary work for fire safety once 
believed to be necessary to open the CVC to the public will no longer 
have to be done. They said that they are still analyzing the work 
associated with those areas where the base project interfaces with the 
expansion spaces and whether and how the need for temporary work for 
fire safety can be minimized or eliminated. 

Although the sequence 2 contractor has taken, plans to take, and is 
considering various actions[Footnote 3] to recover lost time and 
prevent or mitigate further delays, we continue to believe that the 
contractor will have difficulty completing construction before early to 
mid 2007. Our reasons for concern include the uncertainty associated 
with the September changes in the HVAC commissioning and fire 
protection system schedules that have not yet been fully reviewed, the 
schedule slippages to date, optimistic durations for a number of 
activities based on the views of CVC team members, the large number of 
activity paths that are critical, and risks and uncertainties that 
continue to face the project. AOC's construction management contractor 
also points out that further delays could result from congressional 
requests to stop work due to high noise levels in the East Front and 
delays in completing CVC ceiling work necessary for the HVAC and fire 
protection systems, although the CVC team is considering ways to 
mitigate these risks. We also note that the Chief Fire Marshal has not 
yet approved the construction drawings for the fire protection system 
or the schedule for the system's commissioning and testing. 

In addition to our views on the project's September schedule changes 
and progress, we would also like to briefly discuss several schedule- 
related issues about which we have previously raised questions or 
issues or made recommendations to AOC. 

* We have been recommending for some time that AOC improve schedule 
management and analyze and document delays and the reasons and 
responsibilities for them on an ongoing basis--at least monthly. We 
have noted considerable improvements in the CVC team's schedule 
analysis and management since the arrival of the construction 
management contractor's project control engineer several months ago. 
Shortly after his arrival, the scope and depth of schedule analysis and 
management improved significantly, and AOC's construction management 
contractor modified its monitoring process to capture information on 
delays. However, we continue to be concerned about AOC's not having 
adequate information systematically compiled and analyzed to fully 
evaluate the causes and potential responsibilities for delays on an 
ongoing basis. In our view, not having this type of information on an 
ongoing basis is likely to create problems later on should disputes 
arise and knowledgeable staff leave. Also, in this regard, we have 
previously expressed concerns about the need for the project schedule 
to show resources to be applied to meet schedule dates. While the 
sequence 2 contractor has shown proposed resource levels for many 
activities, proposed resource levels have not been included for many of 
the new activities added to the project schedule. The lack of such 
information can complicate the analysis of delays, including their 
causes and costs. AOC agreed that these issues are important and said 
it would discuss them with its construction management contractor. 

* We have previously recommended that AOC develop risk mitigation plans 
to address risks and uncertainties facing the project. In July, AOC 
asked one of its consultants--MBP--to assist it in identifying risks 
and developing plans to address those risks. AOC has identified over 50 
risks facing the project and established a process for addressing them. 
AOC has begun to develop and implement plans for managing these risks. 
As of October 11, AOC had developed plans for addressing 12 risks, such 
as unforeseen conditions associated with constructing the House 
connector tunnel, and fabrication and installation of custom bronze 
doors and windows. AOC said that it will continue to develop plans for 
the remaining risks. It also plans to discuss the risks at a weekly 
meeting and add new risks to its list and develop mitigation plans for 
them as they are identified. 

* The September schedule shows utility tunnel construction being 
completed in February 2006 and CVC's air handlers beginning to operate 
at that time, assuming that they can get steam and chilled water from 
the Capitol Power Plant. During our September 15 testimony, we noted 
several problems associated with CPP that could adversely affect the 
CVC as well as other congressional buildings if not corrected or 
addressed. These problems included, for example, potential delays in 
completing the West Refrigeration Plant Expansion Project, which is 
necessary to provide chilled water to the CVC; the removal from service 
of two chillers in the East Refrigeration Plant because of refrigerant 
gas leaks; fire damage to a steam boiler; and staffing and training 
issues associated with operating the new plant and the absence of a CPP 
director. Since the Subcommittee's September 15 CVC hearing, the fire 
damage to the boiler has been repaired, and the two coal-burning 
boilers that were taken off line for maintenance had been put back on 
line; however, another maintenance problem occurred with one of the 
boilers and it had to be turned off for repairs, which AOC expects to 
have completed by the end of this week. Also, over the Columbus Day 
weekend, heavy rains caused damage to electrical equipment that 
resulted in a power outage affecting the entire plant. Power was 
restored within a few hours; however, because of damage to the 
electrical equipment, power is not available at certain locations 
within the plant. In particular, one of the chillers in the East Plant 
is inoperable because power cannot be provided to it. This incident 
prompted AOC to make a change that affects the West Refrigeration Plant 
Expansion Project. Specifically, AOC has decided to reconfigure the 
chilled water piping system to allow the West Plant to operate in 
isolation of West Plant Expansion. This change, which could result in 
an increase to the contract cost, will decrease CPP's reliance on the 
older East Plant and will enhance its capacity to reliably provide 
chilled water to the CVC and other congressional buildings. Finally, 
AOC recently advertised the vacant director's position. At this time, 
GAO has an active engagement to assess certain CPP issues, such as 
staffing and training for, and the estimated cost to complete, the West 
Refrigeration Plant Expansion Project. This engagement is being 
conducted as part of a separate review for the Subcommittee. 

* Although AOC determined that the sequence 1 work was substantially 
complete in November 2004, the sequence 1 contractor has continued to 
work on punch-list items. Since the Subcommittee's September 15 CVC 
hearing, AOC's construction management contractor added about 15 
additional work items to this list, such as chipping concrete 
interfering with wall stone installation and repairing drains. 
According to AOC's construction management contractor, the sequence 1 
contractor has been making satisfactory progress in completing the 
punch-list work. 

Fire Protection System Issues Are in the Process of Being Resolved: 

The CVC's fire protection system is complicated, interfaces with 
security and other building systems, and encompasses a variety of 
subsystems and components, such as smoke and heat detectors, an alarm 
system, a sprinkler system, a smoke evacuation system, door locks that 
will open in the event of a fire, monitoring and control systems, 
emergency signage, lighting, communication, and a system for preventing 
smoke from entering stairwells--referred to as stair pressurization--to 
allow occupants to get out of the building. We have identified three 
issues related to the fire protection system, each of which we would 
like to briefly discuss. 

1. Evolving design: The CVC's fire protection system has undergone a 
number of design changes and has been the subject of debate among 
relevant stakeholders for a number of reasons, largely due to conflicts 
between security and life and fire safety requirements. According to 
AOC, the building codes governing the design of the CVC often conflict 
with security requirements, do not recognize the unique security needs 
of the Capitol, and are particularly silent when it comes to the 
integration of new air filtration technologies. In addition, AOC said 
that security requirements and the decision to add state-of-the art air 
filtration technology to the project when the construction documents 
were almost complete forced the project team to redesign all of the air 
handling systems in a compressed timeframe in order to maintain the 
overall schedule. It also forced the project team to devise a complex 
design solution with AOC's Chief Fire Marshal and USCP while sequence 2 
was out for bid as well as after the contract had been awarded. On 
October 5, we attended meetings of representatives from the CVC project 
team, AOC's Fire Marshal Division, and USCP where issues surrounding 
the CVC's fire protection system were discussed. Based on those 
discussions and information subsequently provided by AOC and USCP, it 
appears to us that the design of the CVC's fire protection system is 
now essentially complete and agreed to by all of the relevant 
stakeholders. The CVC project team and the Chief Fire Marshal note, 
however, that not all of the shop drawings related to the fire 
protection system have been submitted or approved, and some issues 
could arise during the review process. 

2. Increased cost: As of September 30, executed contract modifications 
and anticipated changes related to CVC's fire protection system totaled 
about $5.3 million, with most of this amount, about $4.4 million, being 
estimated costs for anticipated changes that have not been fully 
evaluated or approved. Changes to the system's design and scope already 
made have resulted in about $900,000 in cost increases. Costs for 
changes that have been made or that are anticipated have increased or 
are expected to increase for several reasons, but the bulk of the 
increases stems largely from two factors--changes requested by AOC's 
Chief Fire Marshal aimed at ensuring that the system meets fire safety 
standards based on his interpretation of code requirements (an area 
where conflict existed between fire safety and security requirements) 
and a disagreement between AOC and a contractor on contract 
requirements regarding certain detection devices. The most costly 
change involving the security/fire safety conflict that the CVC team 
has agreed to relates to the manner in which fresh air will be brought 
into the building to pressurize stairwells to prevent smoke 
infiltration in the event of a fire. The estimated costs for this 
change (including the expansion space) amount to about $2.2 million, or 
over 40 percent of the estimated increased costs for the fire 
protection system. Differences of opinion among CVC team members exist 
on the magnitude of the estimated costs for this change. We have 
discussed this issue with AOC, and it has agreed to fully evaluate the 
cost before it executes additional contract modifications relating to 
stair pressurization. The final costs for the stair pressurization and 
detection devices in question as well as the other anticipated changes 
could change significantly from the estimated amounts once any open 
issues regarding costs are resolved. It is also possible that some of 
the proposed change orders include work items that are not related to 
the CVC's fire protection system, and to the extent this situation 
exists, costs for such work items would not be attributable to the fire 
protection system. 

3. Coordination problems: The CVC project team and AOC' s Fire Marshal 
Division have been experiencing difficulties arranging for timely 
inspections of completed work due to coordination problems involving 
the amount of notice and documentation needed before inspections can 
occur. To improve coordination, the CVC project team has been working 
with its construction management contractor and the Chief Fire Marshal 
to develop a systematic process for arranging for and documenting fire 
safety inspections and is considering hiring a consultant to help 
facilitate the coordination process. The Chief Fire Marshal has 
increased staffing devoted to the CVC and is planning to obtain 
contract support to help perform CVC inspections. The Chief Fire 
Marshal is also reviewing the sequence 2 contractor's September 2005 
schedule to determine whether the sequencing of work and the time 
allotted for fire safety and occupancy inspections are acceptable. 

Our Project Cost Estimate Update Awaits Assessment of Consultant 
Estimate and Schedule Stabilization; Funding Provided Has Not Changed 
Since September 2005: 

AOC's consultant--MBP--finished its work last week to update the 
estimated cost to complete the project. We have not yet had time to 
evaluate MBP's report. Also, as we said during the Subcommittee's 
September 15 CVC hearing, we are waiting for the project schedule to 
stabilize before we begin our work to comprehensively update our 
November 2004 estimate of the cost to complete the project. Thus, we 
are not revising our interim updated estimated cost to complete the 
project of between $525.6 million and about $559 million that we 
discussed at the Subcommittee's September 15 CVC hearing. As soon as we 
evaluate MBP's report and the project schedule stabilizes, we will 
begin our work to assess the reasonableness of the scheduled completion 
dates for the CVC and the House and Senate expansion spaces and 
comprehensively update our estimate of the cost to complete the 
project. 

No additional funding beyond the $527.9 million for construction and 
the $7.8 million that was available for CVC construction or operations 
has been provided for the project since the Subcommittee's September 15 
hearing.[Footnote 4] As you may recall, Mr. Chairman, at your last CVC 
hearing, we expressed concern about possible duplication of work and 
costs in areas where the responsibilities of AOC's CVC construction and 
operations contractors overlap, such as in designing wayfinding signage 
and the gift shops. AOC agreed to work with its operations planning 
contractor to clarify the contractor's scope of work, eliminate any 
duplication, and adjust the operations contract's funding accordingly. 
AOC told us that it has discussed these issues with its contractor and 
concluded that while no duplication of work or funding exists, it needs 
to clarify the contract's scope of work on wayfinding signage because 
it included more work than the contractor would actually do. 

Mr. Chairman, this concludes our statement. We would be pleased to 
answer any questions that you or Members of the Subcommittee may have. 

Contacts and Acknowledgments: 

For further information about this testimony, please contact Bernard 
Ungar at (202) 512-4232 or Terrell Dorn at (202) 512-6923. Other key 
contributors to this testimony include Shirley Abel, Michael Armes, 
John Craig, George Depaoli, Maria Edelstein, Brett Fallavollita, 
Jeanette Franzel, Jackie Hamilton, Bradley James, Scott Riback, Kris 
Trueblood, and Alwynne Wilbur. 

[End of section] 

Appendix I: Capitol Visitor Center Critical Construction Target Dates 
September 16 - October 18, 2005: 

Activity: Drill/Set Soldier Piles Sta. 0:00-1:00; 
Location: Utility Tunnel; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 6/08/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 8/23/05; 
Actual Finish Date: 9/21/05. 

Activity: Wall Stone Area 9 Base; 
Location: Great Hall; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/15/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 11/03/05; 
Actual Finish Date: 9/14/05. 

Activity: 10" South Fire Line; 
Location: Site; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/19/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 1/09/06. 

Activity: Excavate and Shore Sta. 0:00-1:00; 
Location: Utility Tunnel; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/21/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 10/05/05. 

Activity: Concrete Working Slab Sta. 0:00-1:00; 
Location: Utility Tunnel; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/26/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 10/10/05. 

Activity: Waterproof Working Slab Sta. 0:00-1:00; 
Location: Utility Tunnel; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/29/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 10/13/05. 

Activity: Wall Stone Area 1; 
Location: Congressional Auditorium; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 8/08/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 7/22/05. 

Activity: Wall Stone Area 2; 
Location: Congressional Auditorium; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 8/22/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 8/05/05. 

Activity: Wall Stone Area 3; 
Location: Congressional Auditorium; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 9/06/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 8/19/05. 

Activity: Wall Stone Area 5* Base; 
Location: Orientation Theater; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 9/13/05; 
Actual Finish Date: 9/28/05. 

Activity: Perimeter CMU Walls; 
Location: Orientation Lobby; 
April 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 9/20/05; 
June 2005 Scheduled Finish Date: 9/16/05. 

Source: AOC's April and June 2005 CVC sequence 2 construction schedules 
for the scheduled completion dates and AOC and its construction 
management contractor for the actual completion dates. 

Note: Actual completion information was obtained on October 12, 2005. 

*This activity was not noted listed in the April schedule. All other 
activities were critical in the April schedule or became critical in 
subsequent schedules. 

[End of table] 

FOOTNOTES 

[1] See GAO, Capitol Visitor Center: Schedule Delays Continue; 
Reassessment Underway, GAO-05-1037T (Washington, D.C.: September 15, 
2005). 

[2] AOC set September 15, 2006, as the contractual date for completing 
the base project's construction and for opening the CVC facility to the 
public. The House and Senate expansion spaces were scheduled to be 
completed after that date. AOC set the September contract completion 
date in November 2004, when it reached agreement with the contractor on 
a new date for starting sequence 2 that reflected the delays 
experienced on sequence 1. On September 6, 2005, AOC informed Capitol 
Preservation Commission representatives that it still expected the base 
project's construction to be substantially complete on September 15, 
2006, but was postponing the date for opening the facility to the 
public to December 15, 2006, so that it could complete system tests, 
minor punch-list work, and preparations for operations. 

[3] In September, the sequence 2 contractor increased the number of 
stone masons working on the project. For example, AOC's construction 
management contractor reported that an average of 22 stone masons 
worked on the project each work day for the work week ending October 
14, compared to an average of 14 each work day for the work week ending 
August 26. Stone masons also worked on several weekends, and the 
contractor plans to further increase the number of stonemasons during 
October and to re-sequence stonework to help mitigate a delay in the 
exhibit gallery. The contractor has hired an additional subcontractor 
to help construct the utility tunnel and is considering working longer 
hours or additional weekends to recover time. The contractor also plans 
to continue to evaluate the schedule to see what changes can be made to 
save time in a variety of areas. 

[4] AOC had planned to use $100,000 of its fiscal year 2006 
appropriation for CVC construction to move a fire alarm control panel 
in the Capitol building related to CVC construction but outside the CVC 
work area. AOC has decided to pay for this move with other funds, thus 
making the $100,000 available for other CVC construction purposes 
subject to approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations. As we reported in September, AOC had also used about 
$805,000 in CVC operations funds for certain construction work that had 
been funded by the fiscal year 2006 construction appropriation. These 
funds also could be used for other CVC work subject to the Committees' 
approval.