This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-07-197R 
entitled 'Analysis of Data for Exports Regulated by the Department of 
Commerce' which was released on November 17, 2006. 

This text file was formatted by the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to be accessible to users with visual impairments, as part 
of a longer term project to improve GAO products' accessibility. Every 
attempt has been made to maintain the structural and data integrity of 
the original printed product. Accessibility features, such as text 
descriptions of tables, consecutively numbered footnotes placed at the 
end of the file, and the text of agency comment letters, are provided 
but may not exactly duplicate the presentation or format of the printed 
version. The portable document format (PDF) file is an exact electronic 
replica of the printed version. We welcome your feedback. Please E-mail 
your comments regarding the contents or accessibility features of this 
document to Webmaster@gao.gov. 

This is a work of the U.S. government and is not subject to copyright 
protection in the United States. It may be reproduced and distributed 
in its entirety without further permission from GAO. Because this work 
may contain copyrighted images or other material, permission from the 
copyright holder may be necessary if you wish to reproduce this 
material separately. 

November 13, 2006: 

The Honorable Henry J. Hyde: 
Chairman: 
Committee on International Relations: 
House of Representatives: 

Subject: Analysis of Data for Exports Regulated by the Department of 
Commerce: 

In light of the September 2001 terror attacks, you had asked us to 
examine the Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security's 
(BIS) dual-use export control system. We reported our findings in a 
June 26, 2006, report,[Footnote 1] saying that BIS has not 
systematically evaluated the overall effectiveness and efficiency of 
the dual-use export control system. Specifically, we reported that BIS 
has not conducted comprehensive analyses of available data about items 
that have actually been exported from the United States. We made 
several recommendations in that report, including that Commerce should 
use the available data to evaluate the system's effectiveness. Because 
we had difficulty obtaining data on actual exports from Commerce, we 
were unable to provide you with specific details about these data in 
time for our June 2006 report. We have since obtained the data and are 
now transmitting to you our analysis of the data for 2004 and 2005. 

In assessing what dual-use items were exported in 2004 and 2005, we 
analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau, which is part of the 
Department of Commerce and is responsible for collecting and 
maintaining data provided by exporters through the Automated Export 
System. The data comprise items that Commerce regulates under the 
Export Administration Regulations (EAR).[Footnote 2] Because electronic 
filing of export documentation has greatly increased in the past few 
years--previously, paper filings were more common--the data we analyzed 
were for 2004 and 2005 and represent the most complete data from the 
Automated Export System.[Footnote 3] We examined selected fields of 
data, such as license codes, country of destination, commodity type, 
and dollar value of items. The data we present do not include exports 
to Canada because Census relies on Canada's data on what it imported 
from the United States to represent U.S. exports to Canada. The data 
also do not include exports filed on paper; in 2005, paper filings 
represented only 4 percent of the value of all exports. We excluded 
Census data for U.S. territories and possessions because shipments to 
these locations are not covered under the EAR. We assessed data 
reliability by performing electronic testing of the data, obtaining and 
reviewing system documentation, and interviewing Census officials and 
found the data to be sufficiently reliable for the purpose of this 
analysis. We also interviewed BIS officials to determine how they use 
these data. The following analyses focus on 2005 data, as data for 2004 
are not substantially different. Detailed data for 2004 and 2005 are 
contained in enclosure 1. We conducted our review between July and 
November 2006 in accordance with generally accepted government auditing 
standards. 

Summary: 

The data we obtained provide an overall picture of the dollar value of 
commodities subject to Commerce regulations and of the countries 
receiving these exports. Most items do not require government review 
and approval in the form of a license prior to export. We found that 
less than 1 percent of exports subject to Commerce regulations were 
licensed in 2005. The dollar value of unlicensed exports from the 
United States in 2005 was about $624 billion, while the value of 
licensed exports was about $1.2 billion. BIS regulates the export of 
dual-use items that have both commercial and military applications, as 
well as purely commercial items. These items are either specifically 
identified on a control list or fall into a catch-all category referred 
to as EAR99. We analyzed the data according to recipient country, type 
of commodity, and dollar value. Items identified on the control list, 
whether licensed or unlicensed, were generally exported to Asian 
countries, such as China, Taiwan, and Singapore, and to European 
countries, such as France and the United Kingdom. Aircraft, computers, 
equipment to manufacture semiconductors, telecommunications equipment, 
and chemicals were some of the top commodities in terms of highest 
dollar value for exports identified on the control list. Turning to 
EAR99 items, Mexico was the largest recipient of unlicensed exports in 
terms of dollar value, while Cuba and Syria--embargoed countries--were 
the top two recipients of licensed exports. Some of the top commodities 
in terms of dollar value for unlicensed EAR99 exports were industrial 
machinery, chemicals, computers, and semiconductors, while agricultural 
commodities dominated licensed EAR99 exports. The insight we gained 
from analyzing these data further supports our prior recommendation to 
Commerce that it use available data to evaluate the effectiveness of 
its export control system. The data could aid in determining the 
economic impact of current regulations and in evaluating whether 
exporters are complying with regulations. BIS officials told us they 
periodically use portions of the data for enforcement activities but 
currently do not use the data to evaluate the system's effectiveness. 

Background: 

BIS is responsible for implementing and enforcing the EAR.[Footnote 4] 
For fiscal year 2005, BIS had a staff of 414 (including 48 licensing 
officers) and a budget of $67.5 million, of which $33.9 million was for 
the administration of the export control system.[Footnote 5] The 
Commerce Control List (CCL)[Footnote 6] generally specifies dual-use 
items that are designated by a specific Export Control Classification 
Number (ECCN), which describes a particular item and shows the controls 
placed on that item. Dual-use items are regulated for a variety of 
reasons, including restricting exports that could significantly enhance 
a foreign country's military potential, preventing exports to countries 
that sponsor terrorism, and limiting proliferation of chemical, 
biological, and nuclear weapons and their delivery systems. If an item 
is not listed on the CCL but is subject to the EAR, it falls into the 
category known as EAR99. 

Exporters are ultimately responsible for determining whether the items 
they want to export are subject to the EAR and if a license is required 
prior to export. The EAR requires exporters to follow several steps, 
including: 

* classifying their item to determine if it is on the CCL, 

* determining the restrictions that apply to the country the item is 
being exported to, 

* reviewing several lists to determine if they are exporting to a 
denied person or person of concern, and: 

* determining if the item will be used for a prohibited purpose. 

By following these steps, exporters are to determine whether a license 
is required or one of the licensing exceptions permissible under the 
EAR is applicable. Exporters can request a commodity classification 
when unsure of the requirements for exporting an item subject to the 
EAR.[Footnote 7] Through outreach efforts, BIS also educates exporters 
on export requirements. 

After an exporter has either obtained an export license from BIS or 
determined that a license is not needed, the exporter is required in 
most cases[Footnote 8] to document the actual export with a Shipper's 
Export Declaration. Most declarations are filed electronically through 
the Automated Export System. The Census Bureau maintains this system 
and publishes some aggregate data for the purpose of reporting U.S. 
trade statistics. In most cases,[Footnote 9] exporters are not required 
to file an export declaration for exports to Canada because the United 
States and Canada exchange import data, which are used by each country 
to represent its export statistics. 

Most Items Subject to Commerce's Regulations Were Exported Without 
Licenses, with Asia and Europe as Major Recipients of Certain 
Commodities: 

Our analysis of export data shows that more than 99 percent of CCL and 
EAR99 items--or about $624 billion--were exported without licenses in 
2005. These items were exported worldwide, while top recipient 
countries of CCL items were chiefly in Asia and Europe. The majority of 
items, about $555.3 billion worth, were declared by exporters to be 
EAR99. About $1 billion of CCL items were exported with licenses. The 
primary commodities exported from the United States comprised aircraft, 
certain gas turbine engines, industrial and service machinery, and 
computers. Because 2004 data are not substantially different, we focus 
on 2005 data in this section of our letter. Both years' data are in 
enclosure 1. The insight we gained from analyzing this data further 
supports our prior recommendation to Commerce that it use available 
data to evaluate the effectiveness of its export control system. 

Overview of Export Data: 

About $625 billion of U.S. exports were subject to Commerce regulations 
in 2005.[Footnote 10] Exporters declared that about $70 billion of 
these items were on the CCL, representing about 11 percent of all 
exports subject to Commerce regulations. The remaining $555 billion 
fell under the general designation of EAR99. About 98.5 percent of the 
CCL items were exported without licenses, and 99.98 percent of EAR99 
items were exported without licenses, as shown in figure 1. Commerce 
regulations permit both CCL and EAR99 items to be exported without a 
license under a variety of circumstances. 

Table 1: Value of Licensed and Unlicensed Exports Subject to Commerce's 
Regulations, 2005 (in millions of dollars): 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau(data); GAO (analysis and presentation). 

Note: Figure does not include data for Canada. Some numbers may not add 
because of rounding. 

[End of Figure] 

Countries: 

The top countries receiving exports of items identified by exporters as 
being on the CCL were largely in Asia and Europe. In 2005, China, 
Taiwan, Singapore, and France were the largest recipients of both 
licensed and unlicensed CCL exports (see table 1). Among the top five 
recipients of these items, the percentages in terms of dollar value of 
items exported with licenses to those countries ranged from 1.4 to 3.6. 
The majority of EAR99 items exported with a license were to Cuba, an 
embargoed country. In contrast, Mexico--a major U.S. trading partner-- 
received the largest dollar value of unlicensed EAR99 exports. 

Table 1: Top Five Countries in Terms of Dollar Value for Items Exported 
with and without Licenses (2005): 

CCL Items. 

Exported With Licenses. 

Rank: 1; 
Country: France; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $168.47; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 3.64%. 

Rank: 2; 
Country: China; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 123.95; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 1.96. 

Rank: 3; 
Country: United Kingdom; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 101.95; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 2.49. 

Rank: 4; 
Country: Taiwan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 72.80; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 1.39. 

Rank: 5; 
Country: Singapore; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 70.30; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 1.61. 

Exported without licenses. 

Rank: 1; 
Country: Japan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $8,751.83; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 99.58%. 

Rank: 2; 
Country: China; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 6,196.96; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 98.04. 

Rank: 3; 
Country: Taiwan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 5,176.88; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 98.61. 

Rank: 4; 
Country: France; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 4,454.73; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 96.36. 

Rank: 5; 
Country: Singapore; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 4,301.76; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 98.39. 

EAR99 Items. 

Exported with Licenses. 

Rank: 1; 
Country: Cuba; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $104.32; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 40.46%. 

Rank: 2; 
Country: Syria; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 4.89; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 3.55. 

Rank: 3; 
Country: Taiwan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 3.75; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 0.02. 

Rank: 4; 
Country: China; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 2.85; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 0.01. 

Rank: 5; 
Country: Uzbekistan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 2.03; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 2.82. 

Exported without licenses. 

Rank: 1; 
Country: Mexico; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $105,197.71; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 100.00%. 

Rank: 2; 
Country: Japan; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 40,074.20; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 100.00. 

Rank: 3; 
Country: China; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 33,076.30; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 99.99. 

Rank: 4; 
Country: United Kingdom; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 30,369.41; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 100.00. 

Rank: 5; 
Country: Germany; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 29,262.51; 
percentage of all CCL exports: 100.00. 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. 

[End of table] 

Commodities: 

The CCL consists of about 500 ECCNs, which describe the item or types 
of items and designate the controls placed on that item. The top CCL 
items exported with a license include items listed on the Wassenaar 
Arrangement[Footnote 11] munitions list, navigation equipment, 
semiconductor manufacturing equipment, aircraft, and chemicals (see 
table 2). Aircraft and certain aircraft engines were the most common 
CCL item exported without a license in terms of dollar value. Other top 
unlicensed items included computers and electronics. 

Table 2: Top Five Exports of CCL Items by Dollar Value and Export 
Control Classification Numbers, 2005: 

Rank: 1; 
ECCN: 9A018; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported with licenses: Equipment on the 
Wassenaar munitions list[A]; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $129.21. 

Rank: 2; 
ECCN: 7A103; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported with licenses: Instrumentation, 
navigation equipment/systems; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 116.24. 

Rank: 3; 
ECCN: 3B001; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported with licenses: Equipment for 
manufacture of semiconductors; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 89.41. 

Rank: 4; 
ECCN: 9A991; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported with licenses: Aircraft and certain 
gas turbine engines; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 69.50. 

Rank: 5; 
ECCN: 1C350; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported with licenses: Chemicals and 
precursors for toxic chemical agents; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 68.42. 

Rank: 1; 
ECCN: 9A991; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported without licenses: Aircraft and 
certain gas turbine engines; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $29,198.03. 

Rank: 2; 
ECCN: 4A994; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported without licenses: Computers, 
electronic assemblies, and related equipment; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 8,079.06. 

Rank: 3; 
ECCN: 5A991; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported without licenses: Telecommunications 
equipment; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 6,736.68. 

Rank: 4; 
ECCN: 3A991; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported without licenses: Other electronic 
devices and components not covered under 3A001; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 3,490.47. 

Rank: 5; 
ECCN: 3A001; 
Descriptions of CCL items exported without licenses: Electronic devices 
and components; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 3,360.13.  

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. 

[A] Items that fall under 9A018 include certain military trainer 
aircraft including parts and components and ground transport vehicles 
with specific ballistic protection. 

[End of table] 

In terms of dollar value, most EAR99 items exported with a license were 
agricultural and food-related (see table 3). These items required a 
license because they were exported to an embargoed country, such as 
Cuba, or were exported to an end user of concern or in support of a 
prohibited use. In contrast, top U.S. exports that were unlicensed 
EAR99 included industrial machinery, computers, and chemicals. 

Table 3: Top Five Commodity Type Categories for Exports of EAR99 Items 
by Dollar Value (2005): 

Rank: 1; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported with licenses: Other 
agricultural foods; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $41.11.  

Rank: 2; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported with licenses: Feedstuff; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 35.06. 

Rank: 3; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported with licenses: Industrial and 
service machinery; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 8.38. 

Rank: 4; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported with licenses: Soybeans and 
other oil seeds and food oils; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 8.35. 

Rank: 5; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported with licenses: chemicals, 
excluding medicinals and food additives; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 7.63. 

Rank: 1; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported without licenses: Industrial and 
service machinery; 
Value(in millions of dollars): $60,590.56. 

Rank: 2; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported without licenses: Computers, 
peripherals, and semiconductors; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 58,664.01. 

Rank: 3; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported without licenses: Chemicals, 
excluding medicinals and food additives; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 58,465.29. 

Rank: 4; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported without licenses: Other consumer 
nondurables; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 34,248.71. 

Rank: 5; 
Commodity type of EAR99 items exported without licenses: Civilian 
aircraft, engines, and parts; 
Value(in millions of dollars): 24,194.69. 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: These commodity type categories were developed by the Census 
Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis utilizing the international 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule categories. Table does not include data for 
Canada. 

[End of table] 

BIS Analysis: 

In our June 2006 report, we recommended that BIS obtain and analyze 
available data to systematically evaluate its export control system. 
While BIS is responsible for regulating a wide range of dual-use and 
commercial items, it only has visibility over the small portion of 
items it has licensed for export. BIS has not conducted comprehensive 
analysis of export data from Census. BIS officials told us they have 
access to Automated Export System data and can view individual export 
declarations. They said they periodically use these data for 
enforcement activities, such as targeting licensed exports for post- 
shipment verification. 

Analysis of the data gave us insight into how the data could be used. 
We analyzed the data on a macro level to gain insight into the 
magnitude of items leaving the United States, in terms of recipient 
countries and commodities. To gain insight on a micro level, the 
specific data elements could be examined, for example, to determine the 
economic impact of a proposed regulatory change that would add or 
remove licensing requirements for commodities to a country. The data 
could also be used to evaluate industry compliance of regulations, 
especially for unlicensed exports, and target industry outreach 
activities. 

During the course of our review, BIS officials told us the bureau 
recognizes the value of analyzing overall export data and has recently 
established an Office of Technology Evaluation to perform this type of 
analysis. BIS is in the process of hiring analysts with the needed 
skills for this office. In addition, BIS is determining how it can 
better utilize Automated Export System data for analyses. 

Agency Comments: 

We provided Commerce the results of our analysis and obtained oral 
comments. Commerce officials agreed with our analysis and the value of 
using export data to assess the effectiveness of the export system. 
They also provided technical comments, which we incorporated as 
appropriate. 

We plan no further distribution of this letter until 30 days from the 
letter date. At that time, we will send copies to the Secretary of 
Commerce and interested congressional committees. We will also make 
copies available to others upon request. In addition, the report will 
be available at no charge on GAO's Web site at [Hyperlink, 
http://www.gao.gov]. 

If you have any questions about this letter or need additional 
information please contact me at (202) 512-4841 or 
calvaresibarra@gao.gov. Contact points for our Offices of Congressional 
Relations and Public Affairs may be found on the last page of this 
letter. Key contributors to this letter were Anne-Marie Lasowski, 
Assistant Director; Bradley Terry; Brandon Booth; Lily Chin; and Karen 
Thornton. 

Sincerely, 

Signed by: 

Ann Calvaresi-Barr: 
Director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management: 

Enclosure: 

Enclosure I: Analysis of Export Data for 2004 and 2005: 

We are providing export data for 2004 and additional data for 2005. The 
data include overall dollar value of exports under Commerce 
regulations, the top 10 countries of destination, and top 10 
commodities for both years. 

Table 4: Dollar Value and Percentage of Exports for Items Regulated by 
Commerce in 2004 and 2005 (in millions of dollars): 

2004: 

Items: CCL; 
Exported with licenses: $1,166.45 (2.50%); 
Exported without licenses: $45,518.53 (97.50%); 
Total value of items exported: $46,684.98. 

Items: EAR99; 
Exported with licenses: 143.55 (0.03); 
Exported without licenses: 506,411.17 (99.97); 
Total value of items exported: 506,554.72. 

Items: Total value of items exported; 
Exported with licenses: 1,310.01 (0.24); 
Exported without licenses: 551,929.69 (99.76); 
Total value of items exported: 553,239.70. 

2005: 

Items: CCL; 
Exported with licenses: $1,050.85 (1.50%); 
Exported without licenses: $69,026.41 (98.50%); 
Total value of items exported: $70,077.26. 

Items: EAR99; 
Exported with licenses: 126.86 (0.02); 
Exported without licenses: 555,284.75 (99.98); 
Total value of items exported: 555,411.61. 

Items: Total value of items exported; 
Exported with licenses: 1,177.72 (0.19); 
Exported without licenses: 624,311.16 (99.81); 
Total value of items exported: 625,488.88. 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. Some numbers do not add 
because of rounding. 

[End of table] 

Table 5: Top 10 Countries in Terms of Dollar Value for CCL Items 
Exported with and without Licenses in 2004 and 2005: 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. Percentages for some 
countries may not add to 100 percent due to rounding. 

[End of table] 

Table : Top 10 Countries in Terms of Dollar Value for EAR99 Items 
Exported with and without Licenses in 2004 and 2005: 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. Percentages for some 
countries may not add to 100 percent due to rounding. 

[End of table] 

Table 7: Top 10 Exports of CCL Items by Dollar Value and Export Control 
Classification Numbers in 2004: 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. 

[End of table] 

Table 8: Top 10 Exports of CCL Items by Dollar Value and Export Control 
Classification Numbers in 2005: 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: Table does not include data for Canada. 

[End of table] 

Table 9: Top 10 Exports of EAR99 Items by Dollar Value of Commodity 
Type in 2004 and 2005: 

[See PDF for Image] 

Source: Census Bureau (data); GAO (presentation and analysis). 

Note: These commodity type categories were developed by the Census 
Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis utilizing the international 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule categories. Table does not include data for 
Canada. 

[End of table] 

(120578): 

FOOTNOTES 

[1] GAO, Export Controls: Improvements to Commerce's Dual-Use System 
Needed to Ensure Protection of U.S. Interests in the Post-9/11 
Environment, GAO-06-638 (Washington, D.C., June 26, 2006). 

[2] 15 C.F.R.  730-774. 

[3] Electronic filings became mandatory for all items on the Commerce 
Control List in October 2003. 

[4] Other U.S. government agencies regulate other exports. For example, 
the Department of State regulates the export of defense articles and 
services. In fiscal year 2003, State had 35 licensing officers who 
reviewed about 54,700 license applications. 

[5] In addition to administering the dual-use export control system, 
BIS is responsible for enforcing dual-use export control regulations 
and law, along with the Departments of Homeland Security and Justice. 
BIS is also responsible for monitoring the viability of the defense 
industrial base, ensuring industry compliance with arms control 
treaties, enforcing antiboycott laws, and assisting other countries in 
developing effective export control systems. 

[6] 15 C.F.R. Part 774, Supp. 1. 

[7] GAO, Export Controls: Processes for Determining Proper Control of 
Defense-Related Items Need Improvement, GAO-02-996 (Washington, D.C.: 
Sept. 20, 2002.) 

[8] Per the Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (15 C.F.R. Part 30), 
an export declaration is required for most countries for any commodity 
valued at $2,500 or above, with certain limited exemptions. In general, 
a declaration is required for all items requiring an export license. 

[9] Generally, export declarations are not required to Canada unless an 
export license is required or the items are being transshipped through 
Canada to another country. 

[10] In 2005, U.S. world exports, excluding Canada, totaled about $693 
billion. 

[11] The Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms 
and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies is one of four multilateral export 
control regimes in which the United States participates. The 
arrangement establishes lists of items for which member countries are 
to apply export controls. The lists include dual-use goods and 
technologies such as materials, electronics, navigation and propulsion, 
as well as munitions including weapons and ammunition. 

GAO's Mission: 

The Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of 
Congress, exists to support Congress in meeting its constitutional 
responsibilities and to help improve the performance and accountability 
of the federal government for the American people. GAO examines the use 
of public funds; evaluates federal programs and policies; and provides 
analyses, recommendations, and other assistance to help Congress make 
informed oversight, policy, and funding decisions. GAO's commitment to 
good government is reflected in its core values of accountability, 
integrity, and reliability. 

Obtaining Copies of GAO Reports and Testimony: 

The fastest and easiest way to obtain copies of GAO documents at no 
cost is through the Internet. GAO's Web site ( www.gao.gov ) contains 
abstracts and full-text files of current reports and testimony and an 
expanding archive of older products. The Web site features a search 
engine to help you locate documents using key words and phrases. You 
can print these documents in their entirety, including charts and other 
graphics. 

Each day, GAO issues a list of newly released reports, testimony, and 
correspondence. GAO posts this list, known as "Today's Reports," on its 
Web site daily. The list contains links to the full-text document 
files. To have GAO e-mail this list to you every afternoon, go to 
www.gao.gov and select "Subscribe to e-mail alerts" under the "Order 
GAO Products" heading. 

Order by Mail or Phone: 

The first copy of each printed report is free. Additional copies are $2 
each. A check or money order should be made out to the Superintendent 
of Documents. GAO also accepts VISA and Mastercard. Orders for 100 or 
more copies mailed to a single address are discounted 25 percent. 
Orders should be sent to: 

U.S. Government Accountability Office 

441 G Street NW, Room LM 

Washington, D.C. 20548: 

To order by Phone: 

Voice: (202) 512-6000: 

TDD: (202) 512-2537: 

Fax: (202) 512-6061: 

To Report Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federal Programs: 

Contact: 

Web site: www.gao.gov/fraudnet/fraudnet.htm 

E-mail: fraudnet@gao.gov 

Automated answering system: (800) 424-5454 or (202) 512-7470: 

Public Affairs: 

Jeff Nelligan, managing director, 

NelliganJ@gao.gov 

(202) 512-4800 

U.S. Government Accountability Office, 

441 G Street NW, Room 7149 

Washington, D.C. 20548: